Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Bat For Lashes was the bookies' favourite to win the Nationwide Mercury Prize in 2007 for her album 'Fur And Gold'. When Klaxons were announced as winners, there was an audible gasp of surprise in the room. The 2008 prize was won by Elbow for their album 'The Seldom Seen Kid' - head to NME.COM/NEWS for the full story. Photo: PA Photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

The 2001 awards were held on September 11, and when it was announced that PJ Harvey had won the prize for her album 'Stories From The City, Stories From The Sea', Harvey herself was staying in a hotel in Washington DC overlooking The Pentagon, which had been hit by one of the hijacked aeroplanes. Photo: PA photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Gorillaz' self-titled debut album, which went on to sell over seven million copies, was nominated for the Nationwide Mercury Prize in 2001. However, the nomination was withdrawn at the request of the band. Bassist Murdoc said winning would be "like carrying a dead albatross round your neck for eternity".

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

After Gorillaz bassist Murdoc criticised the Nationwide Mercury Prize in 2001, no release involving Damon Albarn has been nominated. The 2008 year's nominees were: Burial, Radiohead, The Last Shadow Puppets, Elbow, Laura Marling, Neon Neon, Adele, British Sea Power, Portico Quartet, Estelle, Rachel Unthank and the Winterset and Robert Plant & Alison Krauss.

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Believe it or not, Kate Moss has performed on a Mercury-nominated album. The supermodel sang backing vocals on the Oasis track 'Fade Away', which appeared on the War Child charity compilation album 'Help', nominated for the Mercury in 1996. Photo: PA photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Arctic Monkeys pick up a Mercury for their chart-topping debut album 'Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not' in 2006. The indie icons followed on from their win with another nomination for second album 'Favourite Worst Nightmare' the year after, missing out to Klaxons' lauded debut 'Myths of the Near Future'. Photo: PA photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

NYC-based songbird Antony Hegarty of Antony And The Johnsons collects the Nationwide Mercury Prize for 'I Am a Bird Now' in 2005. He was a controversial choice of winner as, despite being born in Chichester, Hegarty has lived in New York for many years. The singer-songwriter described the ceremony as being "a bit nutty. It's like a crazy contest between an orange and a spaceship and a potted plant and a spoon - which one do you like better?" Photo: PA photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

In 2000, beanie-sporting singer-songwriter Badly Drawn Boy, aka Damon Gough, won the Mercury Prize for his album 'The Hour of Bewilderbeast'. The singer beat off the likes of Coldplay, Doves and Richard Ashcroft to claim the coveted prize. Photo: PA photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Amy Winehouse performs onstage at the Nationwide Mercury Prize. The lauded singer has been nominated for the prize twice, for 'Frank' in 2004 and 'Back To Black' in 2007. The 2008 Nationwide Mercury Prize takes place in London this evening (September 9). Photo: PA Photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Blur's 'Parklife' is one of many legendary albums not to win a Mercury. 1994 saw a strong list of nominees that also included The Prodigy's 'Music For The Jilted Generation' and Pulp's 'His'n'Hers' - although M People eventually won. Photo: PA Photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Gomez are one of the more unlikely acts to have won a Mercury Award, scooping the prize in 1998, a year that also saw The Verve's 'Urban Hymns' nominated. These days the blues-tinged band are more popular in America, where they recently supported arena-rockers The Dave Matthews Band. Photo: PA Photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Manic Street Preachers have been nominated twice for the award, in 1996 for 'Everything Must Go' and in 1999 for 'This Is My Truth, Tell Me Yours'. At their second ceremony, frontman James Dean Bradfield turned up to the ceremony with Tom Jones, then riding high with his six-million selling 'Reload' album, on which Bradfield guested. Photo: PA Photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Klaxons walked away with the award in 2007, surprising tipsters who had predicted a win for either Bat For Lashes' 'Fur And Gold' or Amy Winehouse's 'Back To Black'. However, Tahita Bulmer, lead singer with nominees New Young Pony Club, complained that the result was too predictable. "The Klaxons already have loads of press. They should have given it to someone smaller who needed a boost." Photo: PA photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

The Streets mainman Mike Skinner onstage at the Nationwide Mercury Prize in 2002. The lyricist was the bookies' favourite to win the prize but missed out to North London R&B star Ms Dynamite. Photo: PA photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Suede's Brett Anderson performs onstage at the Nationwide Mercury Prize. The Britpop pioneers won the prize for their eponymous album in 1993 and went on to be nominated again for their album 'Coming Up' in 1997, narrowly missing out on the award to drum and bass outfit Roni Size And Reprazent. Photo: PA Photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

British music producer and DJ Roni Size onstage with Nationwide Mercury Prize winners Reprazent in 1997. The band went up against the likes of Primal Scream, Radiohead and The Prodigy to win the prize for their album 'New Forms'. Photo: PA Photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Thom Yorke has been nominated a record five times - four times with Radiohead, once for his solo album 'The Eraser' in 2006. He also contributed backing vocals to 2001's winning album, PJ Harvey's 'Stories From The City, Stories From The Sea'. Photo: PA photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Portishead won the Mercury Music Prize in 1995, beating Oasis' 'Definitely Maybe'. Producer James Ford, who worked with Alex Turner on The Last Shadow Puppets' album, reckons the Bristolians should have been nominated again this year. "I think the production's really daring and interesting," he said.

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Talvin Singh won the prize in 1999, a year in which the shortlist was more esoteric than ever. The 'Asian Underground' luminary, whose album 'OK' fused drum n'bass with classical Indian music, topped a list of nominees that also included composer Thomas Ades and jazz saxophonist Denys Baptiste.

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

The Young Knives were nominated in 2007 for their Andy Gill-produced album 'Voices Of Animals And Men', prompting frontman Henry Dartnall to speculate on what the band might spend the prize money on. "We could get our own Winnebago or, I donâ

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

In addition to being nominated for three Academy Awards, actor Johnny Depp has also appeared on a Mercury-nominated album - namely the War Child charity compilation 'Help'. Depp played guitar on the Oasis track 'Fade Away', turning up to the studio with Kate Moss, who contributed backing vocals.

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

The Mercury panel have sometimes come under fire for nominating non-British acts. In 2006 Mark Lanegan & Isobel Campbell's 'Ballad Of The Broken Seas' made the shortlist, even though Lanegan is American. Photo: PA Photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

For many people M People scooping the prize in 1994, a year in which Blur's 'Parklife' was also nominated, represents the Mercury Prize's shameful nadir. Since then, the award has always gone to a broadly 'alternative' act. Photo: PA Photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Primal Scream won the inaugural Mercury Music Prize in 1992 for their groundbreaking 'Screamadelica' album. Afterwards, U2's Bono was incensed - he was convinced his band deserved recognition for reinventing their sound with 'Achtung Baby', which had also been nominated. Photo: Andy Willsher

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Oasis are of the many legendary British bands never to win a Nationwide Mercury Prize. They were nominated in two successive years for their first two albums, 'Definitely Maybe' and '(What's The Story) Morning Glory' but have been ignored by the judging panel since. Photo: PA Photos

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Elbow's Guy Garvey - winner of the 2008 Mercury Prize. As he collected the trophy and a cheque for £20,000 last night in London, singer Garvey declared it was "the best thing that had ever happened" to the band. In this gallery we look back at the ceremony's colourful history of winners and losers...

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Mercury Prize: A History In Pictures

Elbow were announced as winners of the Nationwide Mercury Prize last night (September 9) for their album 'The Seldom Seen Kid'. Frontman Guy Garvey said winning was "the best thing that's ever happened to us" during his acceptance speech.

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Added: 23 Jan 2009

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