NME.COM

Musicians Who'll Be Remembered 100 Years From Now - Chosen By You

  • After Lucy Jones' blog about which artists we'll remember in 100 years, we asked for your suggestions. Richard Citroen said: "Most classic rock stations have been playing Doors records for nearly 50 years - and they'll be playing for 50 more."

    Photo: PA

    Added: 30 Sep 2013

  • Josh Cook, meanwhile, was probably being a bit sarcastic – or we hope so, anyway – when he claimed that everyone will still fondly remember Busted in the future. "But only in the 'Year 3000'," he added, referencing their rather daft single from 2003.

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    Added: 03 May 2012

  • Joel Bonilla says that, even by 3014, people will still be playing catch-up with Icelandic genius Bjork. "She is a hundred years ahead of music," they said on Twitter. "Maybe in 100 years, pop music will sound like her."

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    Added: 11 Jul 2013

  • Writing on Facebook, Andrew Lockmiller reminded us that "in this day and age" 100 years is a "crazy timescale" but still proffered his own choice, too: Aphex Twin. "Maybe if all his unreleased material becomes released," he said, hinting at the vaults of tunes presumably still hidden in the DJ's vaults.

    Photo: Press

    Added: 02 Dec 2013

  • "I assume The Rolling Stones will still be touring," sniffs Freddie Fyffe on Facebook, reminding everyone of the supernatural appeal of Mick, Keith and co.

    Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

    Added: 06 Dec 2013

  • "Arcade Fire of course!" insisted Joel Alexander on Twitter. His reason for choosing the Canadian band? It's because they've always been "developing and innovating from one album to the next."

    Photo: Press/Guy Aroch

    Added: 19 Dec 2013

  • David Bath claims via Facebook: "I think because of the way we put popular music on a podium, the big albums from major genres will still get a listen – so the likes of The Prodigy and De La Soul will still get picked up alongside the more obvious choices."

    Photo: Tom Oxley/NME

    Added: 17 May 2012

  • Detroit duo The White Stripes are James Webster's choice for a never-ending legacy. "The White Stripes will be remembered in a 100 years and beyond as the most important and influential band of their time," he said on Facebook. "Everything they did was amazing and beautiful. Every album was different from the last, but at the same time familiar as it still had that unique sound."

    Photo: Pieter M Van Hattem/NME

    Added: 23 Oct 2013

  • A rather nihilistic approach from Ciaran Byrne, now, who said: "Not sure anything will be remembered. Not sure there will be music." He then provided an appropriately melancholy caveat: "But I'd like to think The Smiths."

    Photo: Getty

    Added: 11 Dec 2013

  • Commenting on NME.COM, Pele Hearne made the case for the Queen Of Pop. "Madonna changed the game whether you love her or hate her. She's the most successful woman in music with a 3 decade-spanning career and was leader of the pack for quite some time. She's earned her place in history and she's not over yet."

    Photo: PA

    Added: 28 Apr 2011

  • Loads of you wanted to put forward the contributions of Thom Yorke and co, with Andrew Noel simply stating: "I think Radiohead would survive, even if it was just for 'OK Computer' due to how much of a classic it's become."

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    Added: 06 Dec 2013

  • Andrew actually had a bevy of suggestions he left on NME.COM. First up: Yeezus himself, Kanye West. "He's got the attitude and commercial attention to go with his revolutionary albums," he says.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 04 Oct 2013

  • And he thinks Arctic Monkeys will still have us all excited in a century's time, too. "They have the potential to survive another 100 years", he reckons – as long as they keep churning out the top albums.

    Photo: Press

    Added: 28 Nov 2013

  • The last suggestion from Andrew, meanwhile, was the iconic Talking Heads, largely because "they've been so influential to other bands".

    Photo: PA

    Added: 18 Apr 2013

  • No-one in their right mind could deny that David Bowie will still be as adored in 100 years, could they? Nathan King certainly wouldn't. "No-one like him ever existed before and no-one like him will exist after him," he declares. "Truly a individual of the music scene."

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    Added: 06 Nov 2013

  • Nathan also said it would be a folly to overlook the Fab Four, too. "The Beatles are the biggest and greatest (in my eyes) band in the history of music," he said. "Let's also not forget John Lennon's death would also contribute to their memory due to its sensitive nature and the collective grief of such a sad event in history."

    Photo: PA

    Added: 02 Nov 2011

  • I would like to say Buddy Holly, Richie Valens, Chuck Berry and The Everly Brothers, but the common person in my age demographic (18-25) does not know them," laments Nathan. "But Elvis they all know – even if only a few songs – and the fact he was The King Of Rock'n'Roll cements his name in music culture forever."

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    Added: 02 Nov 2011

  • His last suggestion is for The Rat Pack: "Between Sammy, Deano, Old Blue Eyes and the rest it's hard to tell who would last the longest, but it's hard to imagine that they would be forgotten."

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    Added: 01 Jun 2011

  • Writing on Twitter, Jacquelyn Amaral argues that the flurry of talk surrounding The Strokes' imminent live return is proof that we'll still be excited about NYC's finest in 100 years. "I mean, look at all the hype just because of their one 2014 tour date," she says.

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    Added: 05 Dec 2013

  • Jarvis Cocker and his bandmates will still be Britpop legends in 3014 says Joseph on Twitter, telling us: "Pulp, surely because of what a top album 'Different Class is'."

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    Added: 08 May 2013

  • "The Stone Roses," says James Beggs on Twitter, predicting that the Madchester legends will still be adored far into the future. "Already lasted a quarter of a century and sound as fresh and relevant as ever."

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    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Chris Lejaruzu reckons the question is a no-brainer. "Muse, of course," he says. "They seem to get bigger and bigger with time."

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    Added: 03 Jun 2013

  • REM called time on their career a couple of years ago, but Jimmy on Twitter says that although they may be gone, they won't be forgotten for a long, long time. "They're the best American band ever, and they brought alternative rock to national attention."

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    Added: 30 Sep 2013

  • Miguel Ruiz thinks we should all acknowledge the staying power and impact of Red Hot Chilli Peppers, meanwhile, simply stating: "They represent rock history."

    Photo: Press

    Added: 10 Aug 2010

  • Some people just have a way with a phrase, don't they? Step forward, Andrew Brearley, who states a case for U2 to be remembered in 100 years by stating: "They piss genius."

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    Added: 03 Jul 2013

  • Salen makes a solid case for German electro pioneers Kraftwerk. "Stuff they did in the 70s sounds like they did it yesterday," they say. And it's hard to argue with that.

    Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

    Added: 02 Oct 2013

  • David DuCharme says that punk renegades The Sex Pistols will be remembered in 100 years. "Their scorched-earth policy changed the course of music in the mid-70s, even if that change only lasted a decade."

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    Added: 20 Sep 2011

  • "Their music comes from the future." says Pablo Sanchez Araya on Twitter. He's talking about Daft Punk, of course.

    Photo: Dean Chalkley/NME

    Added: 02 Dec 2013

  • Stuart Blackwood puts Joy Division forward as a suggestion, writing: "Their music could fit into the music scene at any time and sound new."

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    Added: 20 Jan 2011

  • Damon Albarn may be about to embark on a solo career but, according to Oka Ray Pama, it's his work with Blur that we'll still remember. "The 'Coffee And TV' video is very memorable," they say – not to mention a host of classic songs, albums and gigs too, eh?

    Photo: PA

    Added: 06 Nov 2013

  • Despite the drugs, the bust-ups and all the rest, Kerry-Johanna thinks that The Libertines deserve to be remembered for the right reasons: "They brought spirit back to a very dull time and wrote songs that make us remember better days."

    Photo: Roger Sargent/NME

    Added: 12 May 2011

  • "Oasis for 'Definitely Maybe' and 'What's The Story'," says Jordan Leigh. "Perfect albums." Sounds good, as long as we can forget 'Heathen Chemistry'...

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    Added: 19 May 2011

  • Jow is adamant that The Clash will never be forgotten, even in 100 years time: "They were, and still are, 'the only band that matters'."

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    Added: 05 Nov 2013

  • Emma Ryan puts forward a compelling case for The Cure to gain immortality. "They define a genre, an era and are still going after at least 30 years," she says on Twitter. "Plus the huge amount of variety in their songs."

    Photo: Dean Chalkley/NME

    Added: 06 Jan 2012

  • Tony's equally bullish about why Bobby Gillespie's band should still be popular in a century's time, too, describing Primal Scream as "the only rock and roll band left on the planet".

    Photo: Press

    Added: 31 Jan 2011

  • Writing on Twitter, Stokley says that Giorgio Moroder doesn't need Daft Punk's seal of approval to go down in history. "The man pioneered electronic music into the mainstream and quite literally changed it forever," they say.

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    Added: 23 May 2012

  • "Laura Marling. Amazing guitar player, pure talent," suggests James Williams on Twitter.

    Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

    Added: 24 Aug 2011

  • "The Killers," says Katarina Manos on Twitter. "Because they’ve always strived to be long-lasting and have the quality music to do so."

    Photo: Press/Erik Weiss

    Added: 01 Nov 2013

  • Indieotices on Twitter thinks Australian bunch Tame Impala are a good bet to be remembered for years to come: "They always make good sounds and always make me feel drugged when I watch their videos."

    Photo: Press

    Added: 13 Jul 2012

  • Less of an artist and more of an album nomination from Ethan Storm Haddix, who thinks the debut LP from MGMT will go down in history as an all-time classic. "'Oracular Spectacular'" is going to be a legendary pop album in 100 years," he says.

    Photo: Press

    Added: 06 Sep 2013

  • "Coldplay will be remembered in 100 years time, either as the most hated or most loved alternative band – say what you will!" predicts Adrian Horan on Twitter.

    Photo: Press

    Added: 09 Nov 2012

  • He's already been revered for yonks, but Connor Hall doesn't see Neil Young's status dimming anytime soon."'After The Gold Rush' is probably the best album of the 70s and the guy's got a heart of gold as well," he says.

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    Added: 18 Aug 2011

  • Kevin Hatheway says that hubby-and-wife team Jay Z and Beyonce are unlikely to slip out of our collective memories for quite some time. "Half because of their music," he reasons, "and half because they are the American royal family."

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    Added: 22 Jul 2013

  • This is sure to be a popular suggestion from Ulla Majoube. "Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds. Great lyrics, fantastic music."

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    Added: 27 Nov 2012

  • The tragic passing of Lou Reed was a salient reminder of just how far his musical legacy reaches. "The Velvet Underground will sound both classical and revolutionary, no matter when it is played," agrees Andrew on Twitter.

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    Added: 30 Sep 2013

  • Tim Collingwood has chosen to name a band who he thinks will serve as a cautionary tale rather than be remembered fondly for their greatness. "Mansun," he says. "Hopefully as a reminder to what overhyping a new band can do. A turd in musical format."

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    Added: 23 Jan 2014

  • James Blunt's Twitter is a thing of beauty – certainly more enjoyable than his dirge-heavy tunes, anyhow – so Josh O'Brien hopes he's still knocking around in the future. "James Blunt better last 100 years so he can keep these tweets coming."

    Photo: PA

    Added: 18 Dec 2013

  • Synthpop overlords Depeche Mode will still be going strong in 100 years according to Martha JD, who insists on Twitter: "One of the greatest and most important bands ever."

    Photo: Press

    Added: 20 Feb 2012

  • According to Ed Rushworth, Kasabian have already secured their place in the annals of musical culture. "'West Ryder Pauper Lunatic Asylum' is an unrivalled piece of modern rock," he reckons.

    Photo: Ed Miles/NME

    Added: 15 Jan 2014