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Love Addict

Can we talk racially?...

Can we talk racially? OK. The French: how did it come to this? How did a nation, who for 97 per cent of this century admired popular music only from afar, find it within herself to create the most dynamic dance music of the '90s? Did Ecstasy really succeed where all other drugs so patently could not?



Clearly, the answer is yes. The ecstatic epiphany must have hit Christophe Monier and DJ Pascal R particularly hard as a decade after first being seduced by the Anglo-American acid house invasion the pair now find themselves neck-deep in the astonishingly fertile French house/techno underground.



Magazine editors - of cool techno rag Eden - with membership between them of half-a-dozen acts (including the brilliant Micronauts), Impulsion is another of their guises and it rocks hard. The single 'Rock That House Musiq' boldly announced their block-rockin' plans - stomping, straight-forward house intentions a million miles away from that of soft-focus compatriots Air or Cassius.



'Love Addict' expands on that original missive but only as far as being a library of post-'88 club sounds. If you've been out cold for the last decade and want to know what's soundtracked club culture since you went into deep freeze then allow 'Love Addict' to be your guide.



Hear the best acid bleep in memory on, hey hey, 'Acid Addict', or a squelchy, bouncy x-ray of every garage tune for 'Cesse, C'est Si Bon' and 'Big Muff', or the exact moment where Friday night at Roxy's turns into Saturday afternoon in Top Shop on 'The Trip'.



Unlike many dance artists, Impulsion aren't making grand claims about pushing back sonic barriers. There are no pretensions here. They're the Jack Your Body Ocean Colour Scene, reinventing the past with their own peculiar verve. Which would be horrible if techno wasn't so much more exciting than pony old white-boy R&B.



So, 'Love Addict'. Play it in your car, play it at your hen night. Get on one. Don't think about it too much.
8 / 10

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