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Antenna

Oh, the humanity. Usually, it's a lack of it that informs modern electronic music - a steely futurism that severs the boat of comprehension from the jetty of sense, and languishes in its own cool mean

Oh, the humanity. Usually, it's a lack of it that informs modern electronic music - a steely futurism that severs the boat of comprehension from the jetty of sense, and languishes in its own cool meaninglessness. But if you're bewildered by the stark abstractions of Autechre or Pole, let Stuart Cullen - the man behind Brighton's Pilote - soothe you home; the shrill two-note squeal that pre-empts the cerebral patter of 'Turtle' is nothing more oblique than the sound of a man whistling for his dog.



Cobbled together on "an old PC and a dodgy Yamaha" - and in these playfully lo-fidelity sonic realms, we can only assume that's the keyboard, and not the motorbike - 'Antenna' is a thoroughly likeable trawl through electronica's treasured cast-offs. 'Microphones' offers a pared-down take on the Aphex Twin's skittish dynamism, 'Message From The Bigman' marries lonely unfurling synths to some very bad swear words, and the aforementioned 'Turtle' pulls off a similar trick to the remarkable Funkstorung remix of Bjvrk's 'All Is Full Of Love' earlier this year - so emotive are its strains, that you can barely believe that it's been pieced together with cold, dead machinery.



No ghosts in Pilote's machine, then. But refreshingly, a human heart.
7 / 10

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