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London W1 Lil' Backyard Club

In the world of retro grave-robbing, where authenticity is prided above all else, [B]'Gimme Your Love'[/B] and [B]'How Does It Feel'[/B] are not the homages to [a]Stevie Wonder[/a] and [B]John Lee

London W1 Lil' Backyard Club

The man with the dreadlocks is howling. He has something on his mind. "Play," gravel-voiced Graeme Kyle, [a]Koot[/a]'s singer, demands, "the rock'n'roll!" As statements go, it's hardly storming the Bastille. But then [a]Koot[/a], as self-appointed soulmen, blues brothers, and people who evidently believe R&B does not include Mary J Blige, have history on their minds and reverence in their souls.



Breaking new ground is not on the agenda, but new single 'Mississippi Soul' is irreverently and sleepily stoned, while 'Feet Don't Fail Me' is a fine stew of devotional gospel and soul. True, it's so heavily indebted to 'Screamadelica' you half expect Graeme to announce he's "movin' on up" at any moment, but never mind.



Elsewhere, the past is served up in a less convincing manner. Because, in the world of retro grave-robbing, where authenticity is prided above all else, 'Gimme Your Love' and 'How Does It Feel' are not the homages to Stevie Wonder and John Lee Hooker they doubtless imagine, but sound like Lenny Kravitz and Gomez collaborating on a bland Levi's ad soundtrack. [a]Koot[/a] are convinced they're heirs to a long-lost blooze heritage. Cynics might like to note they come from Canterbury.

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