Goodbye Enemy Airship The Landlord Is Dead

The only vocal sound that can be heard upfront is an exasperated cough at the end of another understated, yet turbulent, instrumental..

Goodbye Enemy Airship The Landlord Is Dead

7 / 10 The only vocal sound that can be heard upfront is an exasperated cough at the end of another understated, yet turbulent, instrumental. And yet an unspoken political agenda guides Toronto's [a]Do Make Say Think[/a] through their sombre, melancholic and spiky moods: the politics of refusal. A refusal to be customised, branded and merchandised; as well as a refusal to conform. While much here can loosely be termed 'post-rock', the four-piece's guiding ethos seems to hark back further, to the post-punk '80s.



Which is to say 'Goodbye Enemy Airship...' has been stamped with a uniqueness that either comes from intuition or from people who have 'unlearned' whatever their formative influences were. With horns and subtle electronics - to provide a counterpoint to minor-key guitar drones, percussive rumbles and carefully picked notes - DMST evoke a sense of loss, sadness and loneliness that goes beyond language.



Sometimes it gets too much; like the mournful trumpets on 'The Landlord Is Dead' and the seemingly never-ending coda on the closer, 'Goodbye Enemy Airship'. These are moments when you wonder why relatively affluent kids should seem so unhappy. But then again, perhaps money buys the luxury to wallow in despair. A welcome step sideways, nonetheless.

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