London Kentish Town Bull & Gate

The music industry isn't just a harsh mistress, but a veritable dominatrix.

The music industry isn't just a harsh mistress, but a veritable dominatrix. Just ask Andy Yorke.

He has a vision and he gets two like-minded souls to join him in Unbelievable Truth, is signed to an Oxford indie label, gets snapped up by Virgin Records, has two chart hits, gets dropped and lands exactly back where he started. Plus - and this is where it gets cruel - Andy also happens to be Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke's brother. Which should add up to a music laced with anger, shot through with venom, and topped up with seething envy.

Except it doesn't. Not really. The bright lights of Unbelievable Truth's past have lent their new songs a dark, melancholic hue, quietly removed from the current hegemony. Yes, there's a suppressed rage on new single 'Agony', but it's more akin to the prolonged yelps of men imprisoned for too long than the jealous variety.

What Yorke, Nigel Powell and Jason Moulster also have going for them is the ability to contrast noise and melody on churning mid-tempo tunes that hold the attention as much as they unsettle the constitution. And there's no need to flail around wildly or even show any obvious outward emotion beyond satisfaction at the crowd's reverent response. What you hear is what you get. Which would be dull in more expansive surroundings, but is the perfect way to do people's heads in at this level. A level, incidentally, Unbelievable Truth will soon leave behind.

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