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Fireworks City

Adam Tinley returns to the game almost a decade after his electro-soul noodlings rode the acid-house boom to Number One with his massive hit 'Killer'....

ADAM TINLEY RETURNS TO THE GAME ALMOST a decade after his electro-soul noodlings rode the acid-house boom to Number One with his massive hit 'Killer'. But his new mood is far more mellow: mature singer-songwriter meets post-rave minstrel. Which means rippling harps and pizzicato strings straight out of the Enya songbook, liberal portions of mid-tempo funk and the occasional polite acid bassline. Most of the vocals are delivered by Gerideau Theo, who boasts a warm but unspectacular soul-man burr not far removed from Adam's one-time collaborator Seal.







Deviations from this plush but passionless cocktail-bar format are few, though the most interesting finds veteran soul shouter Geno grumbling over sedate strings and booming bass shudders on 'God's Teeth'. Former single 'One Of The People' still cuts a dapper Freakpower-esque dash, while the splendidly titled 'Existential Boredom' paints a Blur-style portrait of comically drab suburban lives. There's also a 'secret' music hall version of slinky first track 'Memories Of The Future' tacked on the end, but it proves as underwhelming as the original.







It's a good job Adam has already earned his footnote in rave culture history. His Thing is already proving highly forgettable.
4 / 10

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