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Sven Vath: Kuala Lumpur Movement

He doesn't play for 13 hours like last time, but it's still great...

The last time Sven Vath played in Malaysia he delivered a 13-hour set in a jungle clearing somewhere in the hills above Kuala Lumpur. This and subsequent illegal parties caused such a media upset in this Muslim land that it brought the whole future of the country's dance scene into question.



Tonight the venue's legal but there's still that underground buzz. Vath is in party mood: before his set he wanders around the club, chatting, sharing a beer and having his photo taken. It's a far cry from the high-security apparatus demanded by many DJs.



Warming up for the German techno-dominator is discomafia, a Malaysian electronica outfit who bombard the early evening crowd with a performance that takes in drum 'n' bass, techno and house. Inspired lunacy, it has the club throbbing and screaming as Vath cues the first tune.



With time on his side, the first part of Vath's set consists of funky vocal house numbers, settling into his shimmering techno groove at about 2am. Slipping in a handful of his own tracks, the beat doesn't die until 6am. With Movement's doors firmly shut, the party relocates to the headquarters of promoter Frenzy. Here Vath gets into a more Balearic vibe as the hardcore chill-out or dance off the last of the night's energy until past midday. If the human body was less frail, you can imagine Vath playing on forever.



mea

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