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Five Die Filming This Lazy Lark

They work so naturally within a supposedly male-dominated musical medium that you'd not only argue that women can play country rock but that the natural voice of country rock is female...

Hazeldine in Eastern Europe might seem about as appropriate as balalaikas in Arizona, but there are 30,000 ex-pat Americans in Prague and a few of them are here tonight to savour a home-baked slice of the old country. Sorry, that should be new country.



Languid and vaguely sexy, Hazeldine's principal guitarist/songwriters, SHAWN BARTON and TONYA LAMM, come across like a more mature, laid-back version of the THROWING MUSES' KRISTIN HERSH and TANYA DONELLY. Like the Muses, they work so naturally within a supposedly male-dominated musical medium that you'd not only argue that women can play country rock but that the natural voice of country rock is female.



A coven of gothettes up the front are certainly going ape, as if fired up by the oestrogen charge of 'Digging You Up' and 'Bob'. Or maybe it's the way Tonya and Shawn jam easily along, back to back on 'Right To Feel'. On record, Hazeldine flow rather than burst the banks of their songs, but after a mid-set break for tequila slammers, they start cutting loose, their chords leaving scorch-marks of intensity, ` la RADIOHEAD. Highlight of the evening, however, is Tonya's a cappella rendition of 'Dead Love', on which the chill running across the narrative terrain of Hazeldine's songs whistles right through to your bones.
7 / 10

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