Organism

Filching from film scores,[I] [B]News At Ten[/B][/I], nursery rhymes and the cold clip of circuitry,[B] Tenor's[/B] creation is surprisingly down-tempo, invariably cheesy (this is a man known to ride

Organism

7 / 10 The lunatic Finn with the cape and the Warhol fixation returns, running rampant through Studio 54's playlist, splicing it randomly with the soundtrack to [I]2001: A Space Odyssey[/I]. Tenor's muse is the voice of end-of-the-century schizophrenia, and every track on 'Organism' (his second album) bulges with screechingly disparate elements of fast-forward media and technology run amok.







Filching from film scores,[I] News At Ten[/I], nursery rhymes and the cold clip of circuitry, Tenor's creation is surprisingly down-tempo, invariably cheesy (this is a man known to ride a white stallion into gigs) and strangely soulful.







There's the [I]Saturday Night Fever [/I]soundtrack-in-a-meat-grinder disco slam of 'Total Devastation', the creepy pulp horror organ bellow of 'Serious Love', the Barry White pastiche of 'Love And Work' and the low-slung lounge-core sleaze of 'Xinotepe Heat' (intermittently sounding like a telephone being mistreated).







Tenor even takes a housey stab at Prince's '1999' conceit with 'Year Of Apocalypse' - only the uplifting, light-footed insouciance of its "We're gonna party and have a good time" chorus is tempered by the spooky hum of a gospel choir creeping in like an omen of doom.







Tenor's 'Organism' is a Frankenstein's monster with two left feet but buckets of charm. Useless on the dancefloor, then, but great in bed.

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