Whitey Ford Sings The Blues

The songs are tempered with a palette of non-hip-hop colourings  the folksy overtones of single [B]'What's It Like'[/B], for example  and framed in spartan, acoustic guitar, giving [B]'Whitey For

Whitey Ford Sings The Blues

6 / 10 Less top of the morning, more the dead hours after midnight, 'Whitey Ford Sings The Blues' is the solo debut of [a]Everlast[/a], former leader of Boston-Irish homeboys House Of Pain. While such crimes against humanity as pissed-up anthem 'Jump Around' remain unforgiven, the artist formerly known as Erik Schrody is showing signs of repentance.



For while House Of Pain dealt in the worst kind of close-combat hip-hop, 'Whitey Ford...' shows distinct signs that a soul lingers beneath the beer-boy rhetoric. A brush with mortality in the form of a near-fatal heart attack midway through recording (documented on 'Painkillers') has seen to it that this is an album with a conscience, an album that moves beyond a mindless drunken lurch towards unconsciousness.



The songs are tempered with a palette of non-hip-hop colourings - the folksy overtones of single 'What's It Like', for example - and framed in spartan, acoustic guitar, giving 'Whitey Ford...' an identity somewhere between the backwoods balladeering of Beck and the macho-free rhymes of Jurassic 5.



A couple more explosive tunes wouldn't do any harm, but at least this shows that behind the boneheaded bullshit, even homeboys get the blues.

To rate this track, log in to NME.COM

To read all our reviews first - days before they appear online - check out NME magazine, on sale every Wednesday

Comments

Please login to add your comment.

More Videos
More
Latest Tickets - Booking Now
 
Know Your NME
 

 
NME Store & Framed Prints
Inside NME.COM