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Dirtbombs/The Cyril Lords : Detroit Magic Stick

an affordably screamy garage-rock trip...

With Jack White otherwise engaged in Chicago, and a dark cloud of violence and tabloid attention hanging over his hometown, tonight sees the second division of Detroit garagers given their chance to hold court and lay claim to the title of best rock band in the Motor City. In front of a pretty good-looking, slightly liquored and completely on-the-make crowd, the three faces in the Detroit-via Ohio Cyril Lords offer an affordably screamy garage-rock trip, stoking the crowd (complete with regulation members of The Von Bondies and Soledad Brothers) with a disciplined 30 minute set. Then, after the stroke of midnight, The Sights run through their retro-rock thing. It's loud, but a little too humourless for a party night like this.





It's up to garage-soul heroes The Dirtbombs, then, to finally settle any doubts about whether or not this is the place to be on New Year's Eve, with frontman and ex-Gories-leader Mick Collins - sporting his now-legendary wraparound shades - providing the cues. Playing with authority via their double-bassist and double-drummer line-up, the band cut fifteen-plus songs in just over an hour, mostly from their newest release 'Dangerous Magical Noise'. Though there are a few on-stage flourishes, including a behind-the-back guitar rave-up by Collins and Meg White's flatmate Ko Zydeco holding out her bass so we can better see her glam pink mod dress, most of the show’s thrills came from the stamping-plant power of The Dirtbombs' delivery. Songs like 'I Can’t Stop Thinking About It', and ironic tour favorite 'I’m Through With White Girls', are the true shake-up numbers, pushing the by-now intoxicated crowd into a frenzy. In true NYE karaoke style, they even chuck in a couple of covers, including Curtis Mayfield's 'Kung Fu', deep Northern Soul standard 'Chains Of Love' and even the Eurythmics' '80s classic 'Missionary Man'.





As the crowd begins to thin after three hours of New Year's Eve booze and full-on volume, the stragglers upfront inspire the band to new levels. During the final song co-drummer Ben Blackwell executes a headstand on his bass drum and tackles guitarist Pat Pantano, leaving the stage trashed and the crowd happy. Though Ma Blackwell is concerned about her son's bleeding, all The Dirtbombs care about is whether or not they delivered. They did, naturally.





Carleton Gholz

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