First for music news
This Week's Issue
You’re logged in

London WC2 LA2

Meet [a]Cake[/a], five men from California led by [B]John McCrea[/B] and armed with a world view that's off-centre, wry and, after prolonged exposure, really rather annoying...

London WC2 LA2

There is a question that has long perplexed rock scholars: namely, does comedy belong in popular music? A more pertinent version of this is: does irony belong in American bands?



Meet [a]Cake[/a], five men from California led by John McCrea and armed with a world view that's off-centre, wry and, after prolonged exposure, really rather annoying. Musically, [a]Cake[/a] are GCSE-level Pavement, but don't worry, because they aren't really about music. [a]Cake[/a]'s purpose on earth is to act as a vessel for McCrea's lyrics. These are songs with lovably off-beat titles such as 'Satan Is My Motor' and 'Sheep Go To Heaven' ([I]"...goats go to hell"[/I]), whose choruses the audience will sing before they've even been played.



Occasionally though, McCrea gets bored of being the joker. He has feelings you see. So we get the odd lovelorn missive like 'Mexico' where the lighters come out in non-ironic force. But it's too little too late and behind McCrea's beanie hat, beard and shades it's hard not to imagine an arched eyebrow and smug grin. And behind that - ultimately very little.

To rate this track, log in to NME.COM

To read all our reviews first - days before they appear online - check out NME magazine, on sale every Wednesday

Comments

Please login to add your comment.

More Videos
More
Latest Tickets - Booking Now
 
Know Your NME
 

 
NME Store & Framed Prints
Most Read Reviews
Popular This Week
Inside NME.COM
On NME.COM Today