Revolution is sexy. But while [a]Rage Against The Machine[/a]'s tireless polemic was tarted up with [B]Che Guevara[/B]'s sharp sense of radical chic, [a]Biohazard[/a]'s take on sledgehammer politics m

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New World Disorder

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New World Disorder

Revolution is sexy. But while [a]Rage Against The Machine[/a]’s tireless polemic was tarted up with Che Guevara‘s sharp sense of radical chic, [a]Biohazard[/a]’s take on sledgehammer politics make them about as alluring as Fidel Castro.

Yeah, ‘New World Disorder’ tries to be political. But for all the government-baiting schtick, that revolution [a]Biohazard[/a] are plotting is going to go off half-cocked. Behind the brow-beating, the ultra-heavy riffing and the blood’n’guts bellowing, it’s all mouth, all voluminous shorts, but no trousers.

For all that talk of insurrection there’s precious little regarding that elusive political point. [a]Biohazard[/a] are the knuckleheads of the No Sell Out ethic, content in woolly sloganeering: “I resist the pressure to be who you want me to be/I resist the pressure/I resist so I am free” (on, er, ‘Resist’) is about as incisive as Cast‘s ‘spiritual transcendence, la” philosophy, and when frontman Billy Graziadei bellows, “It’s easy to say we scream for change when everyday we act the same” on ‘Decline’ you’re inclined to agree. Does the world really need a sixth [a]Biohazard[/a] album? Let alone the other five?

Sexy? [a]Biohazard[/a] are heavy metal eunuchs, and for that they’re barely worth a