...After years writing soundtracks to non-existent movies through his work with [a]Tortoise[/a], there's a certain inevitability about [a]John McEntire[/a] finally getting round to scoring a real film

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Or, inevitably, [I]Reach The Post-Rock[/I]. After years writing soundtracks to non-existent movies through his work with [a]Tortoise[/a], there’s a certain inevitability about [a]John McEntire[/a] finally getting round to scoring a real film. The one surprise comes from it being a movie produced by John [I]Home Alone[/I] Hughes, rather than some moody arthouse job.

That said, McEntire‘s excellent score treats [I]Reach The Rock[/I] as if it actually is a moody arthouse job, being the kind of purposeful wandering around the fringes of avant-rock, electronica, lounge, jazz and dub that you’d expect from the mainstay of [a]Tortoise[/a] (and half the bands in Chicago, come to that). If anything, the focus is more on electronica, with the clattering pseudo-drum’n’bass of ‘Quinn Goes Town’ and the 5-Ziq ez-stylings of ‘Lise Arrives’ sounding as if they’re isolated components of some sprawling [a]Tortoise[/a] cut-and-paste collage.

Elsewhere, a rigorous incestuousness rules, with tracks from [a]Tortoise[/a] themselves (tenser and less jazzy than of late); McEntire‘s other band, The Sea And Cake (a song slightly uncomfortably grafted onto atmospherics); former [a]Tortoise[/a] member Bundy K Brown (fairly bleak isolationist humming); and newcomers Dianogah, who sound quite unnervingly like – uh-huh – [a]Tortoise[/a]. [I]Early[/I] [a]Tortoise[/a], mind, so that’s alright.

You get exactly what you’d expect, in other words. One for [a]Tortoise[/a] fans.