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Fold

From the home of [a]Conemelt[/a] and the terrific [B]'Spunk Jazz'[/B] collection comes this diverse excursion into club-friendly techno tempered with bursts of deep-space trip-hop and the low but ever

From the home of Conemelt and the terrific 'Spunk Jazz' collection comes this diverse excursion into club-friendly techno tempered with bursts of deep-space trip-hop and the low but ever-present hum of electrical pylons.



Tube Jerk is Tim Wright, sometime member of Germ and Sand, which probably means as little to you as it does to me. But 'Fold', adorned with Warholian shots of chrome-warped car wrecks, manages to make left-field disco dissonance sound both accessible and uncompromising.



If this were Channel 4's This Is Modern Art, Matthew Collings would probably arch his eyebrow and brand Wright's wriggly style "post-minimalist". That is, it's spare but not square, late-'90s liquid rather than late-'80s rigid. This is finely honed techno with a jaunty twist, a gentle sense of its own absurdity and a penchant for understated mood lighting. It cooks Pacific Rim, drives an Audi, listens to Daft Punk and only drinks absinthe at weekends.



Or perhaps not. Maybe this is just where the glooping electroid gallop of 'Husk Jar' or the juicy throbmatic pulse of 'Each' lead the listless listener's mind with their elegantly blank abstractions. But we can certainly agree that Wright's tech-house vision is rounded, supple and sinewy. And at least the frenetic acid belches of 'Please Breathe' and the turbo-revving motorbike riffs of 'Eight' demonstrate he has the wit to value noisy melodrama over orthodox good taste, as does the Dave Clarke-style robot-war cacophony of 'Daddy's In The Basement Diggin' Gravy'.



The post-minimalist party starts here. Bring your own absinthe.
7 / 10

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