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London W1 100 Club

[B]The Lanterns[/B] have been described as a 'Hibernian-urban-alternative-electro-folk-pop ' trio, which is a somewhat media-matey way of saying they come from Edinburgh and make eclectic noises, d

It's all about context. Do you see? The Lanterns have been described as a 'Hibernian-urban-alternative-electro-folk-pop ' trio, which is a somewhat media-matey way of saying they come from Edinburgh and make eclectic noises, daddio. Smarter still, they already have tucked beneath their belts the rough delights of 'HighRise Town', their single about tower blocks, concrete decay and suchlike.



Ergo, the last place you'd expect to find The Lanterns making their London debut is somewhere like the Improv, with its tables, chairs and suffocating sense of orthodoxy. Because what could well be a quirky, crumpled delight down a rammed Arse & Hoo-Har gig is little more than a mild diversion in this environment, where Sylvia and Gina Rae give it their vocal all (albeit with the awkwardness of sisters auditioning for Stars In Their Eyes before the makeover), while musical maestro Jim Sutherland plays what appears to be a customised sitar and three session musos glide along in the shadows.



And therein lies the problem: Hibernian The Lanterns most certainly may well be, but it's hard to equate the 'urban-alternative-blah-blah' bit with this prim set. Indeed, it's hard to work out if this music is intended to be soft focus or is just out of focus, as The Lanterns slide confusingly between The Blue Nile's lush musings and the glossy snap of Alisha's Attic, grasping at pop straws. No wonder they look so confused. Unfinis

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