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Crazy Town : Revolving Door

Crazy Town in misogynist wankers 'shock'...

Crazy Town : Revolving Door

Like *NSYNC appearing on Celebrity Stars In Their Eyes as Red Hot Chili Peppers ('Tonight, Mathew, we're going to be stultifyingly
derivative') Crazy Town are back with another song about ladies (does that word not conjure up images of Penelope Keith in a big hat?)

'Revolving Door' is a song ironically written about the ironic idea of installing an ironic revolving door in their house so that ironic ladies can come and have ironic sex with them and then go away quickly. The added bonus being that the video-shoot is full of scantily clad models, whom Crazy Town can touch and leer at, and no one can shout at them because it's ironic! Genius. It's funny how all exploitation of women, nowadays, is ironic. Let's hope the day is not far away when we can be ironically racist too. Can't wait to see that video.

Crazy Town are not the sharpest tattoo needles in the parlour. The kind of people employed to test items advertised as 'idiot-proof'. What is more
frightening is that British children find this group to be of merit. In a country where indie means acoustic guitars and Thom Yorke impersonators and
where even a1 are recording a rock album then this kind of stupid nonsense represents the alternative. Rebellion reduced to nothing more than a pierced eyebrow and a permanently raised middle finger. Sid Vicious would spit in his grave.

The real irony is that any 'lady' dumb enough to sleep with these men is probably still stuck in the revolving door to this day, pushing in one direction while Crazy Town push hard in the other.

Timothy Mark

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