Glastonbury : All the major stages reviewed

Your definitive guide to who rocked Worthy Farm this year...

Who rocked Glastonbury?







Was Paul McCartney really the biggest draw at Glasters?







The festival's first big draw was Oasis headlining the Pyramid Stage on Friday. The band set mainly consisted of songs from ‘Definitely Maybe’ and '(What's The Story) Morning Glory', but the band also showcased two new tracks: ‘A Bell Will Ring’ and ‘The Meaning Of Soul’.







Later that night Fatboy Slim and the Chemical Brothers played a surprise DJ gig at Lost Vagueness under the pseudonym Drunk Soul Brother, upstaging the Chemical Brothers' Other Stage headline gig.







Saturday was all about Paul McCartney's debut Glastonbury gig. McCartney ripped through crowd-rousing versions of ‘All My Loving’, ‘Back In The USSR’, ‘Hey Jude’, ‘Live And Let Die’, ‘Yesterday’, ‘Helter Skelter’ and ‘Let It Be’.







But the surprise successes of Saturday were in the New Bands Tent with both Las Vegas' The Killers and Hope Of The States turning in blinding sets that draw crowds 20-people deep outside the tent.







On Sunday, Orbital played their penultimate gig ever (T In The Park is their last), running through greatest hits such as 'Satan', 'Halcyon', 'Belfast' and a The Darkness-sampling 'Lush'.







The Zutons, Razorlight and The Ordinary Boys also played brilliantly on Sunday. But it's Muse who stole the day with a set of urgent tunes that propelled them into the big league.







To read full reviews of Glastonbury click on the links below:







Friday New Bands Tent







Friday Other stage part 1







Friday Other Stage part 2







Friday Pyramid Stage part 1







Friday Pyramid part 2







Saturday New Bands Tent part 1







Saturday New Bands Tent part 2







Saturday Other Stage part 1







Saturday Other Stage part 2







Saturday Pyramid Stage part 1







Saturday Pyramid Stage part 2







Sunday Other Stage







Sunday Pyramid Stage

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