First for music news
This Week's Issue
You’re logged in

Living In The Flood

Introduced to a new generation by his work with Massive Attack, Andy is a silken-voice warbler from pre-ragga Jamaica...

Living In The Flood

6 / 10 Introduced to a new generation by his work with Massive Attack, Andy is a silken-voice warbler from pre-ragga Jamaica - a rare songbird a-quiver with warmth and loss, despair and ecstasy. The recent 'Skylarking' compilation retraced his glory years with such mercurial studio maestros as Bunny Lee, Augustus Pablo and Coxsone Dodd. But 'Living In The Flood', his first all-original album in over a decade, substitutes well-respected present-day producer Clive Hunt for the errant geniuses of old and can't help pall in comparison .

/img/HoraceAndyCover1099.jpg Some of it, desperate to cover as many marketing options as possible, is indeed embarrassing. The songbird constricted inside dreadlock'd holiday manoeuvres, starched-shirt businessman reggae and sickly pop sap. But thankfully Andy has not forsaken his core strength as a voice of reggae conscience. His interpretation of the timeless street-kid ballad 'Johnny Too Bad' is fraught and deeply felt, he brings a sanctified longing to the last days prophesy of the title track, co-written with Joe Strummer, and the self-penned 'Don't Blame The Children' is astonishing, a cry against violence that simultaneously acknowledges its heavily marketed glamour.

Other collaborations - with Massive's 3D on 'Doldrums' - are less successful. But this is far from a failure - emerging proud and resilient, the Andy vocal is a precious resource that won't weaken - no matter how inappropriate the setting.

To rate this track, log in to NME.COM

To read all our reviews first - days before they appear online - check out NME magazine, on sale every Wednesday

Comments

Please login to add your comment.

More Videos
More
Latest Tickets - Booking Now
 
Know Your NME
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
 

 
NME Store & Framed Prints
Most Read Reviews
Popular This Week
Inside NME.COM
On NME.COM Today