Lostprophets : The Fake Sound Of Progress

Lostprophets' story is a heartening tale. Growing up in the cultural void of Pontypridd, the sextet absorbed American metal, hardcore and hiphop as an escapism.

Lostprophets' story is a heartening tale. Growing up in the cultural void of Pontypridd, the sextet absorbed American metal, hardcore and hiphop as an escapism.





Nearly four years later, they've picked up an astonishingly devotedfanbase (this writer knows of at least one bloke with

Lostprophets tattooed on his neck); with this re-jigged version of last year's debut album, they'll probably do it all again Stateside.





The way they've buffed every nuance to a high sheen unquestionably reflects the Prophets' desire to get into the US market's big trousers. But it also strips 'The Fake Sound...' of its visceral punk scuzziness - although '...And She Told Me To Leave' remains a touching foray into tearful, ooh-aren't-girls-funny emo. Tracks like 'Shinobi Vs Dragon Ninja' still sound like skilful splices of Faith No More, Linkin Park and a slicker Fugazi. Meanwhile, the regrettably-named Jamie Oliver scratches away with some aplomb - it's just that he's invariably superfluous. Few nu-metallers have successfully brought hiphop elements to their macho crunch, and Lostprophets don't change that record.





The sextet currently straddle a gap between Fugazi and Limp Bizkit, and soon they'll have to choose which side to take. Either way it'll be interesting to watch.



Noel Gardner

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