Historic Sheffield gig venue The Harley to close “with immediate effect”

"The venue may have come to an end, but the memories will live on.”

Historic Sheffield venue The Harley has been forced to close “with immediate effect” in a move that has shocked gig goers in the area.

Blaming increasing financial pressures, the owners said the venue was no longer viable in a statement released earlier today (April 5).

Having hosted a number of high-profile acts in their early days including Artic Monkeys, Alt-J, The XX  and Royal Blood, the venue was a keen supporter of local music and hosted several club nights throughout the year.

Writing on Facebook in a now deleted post, The Harley wrote: “It brings us great sadness that we have to shut The Harley with immediate effect. Mounting financial pressures, much like many other music venues across the country, means that the business was no longer viable.

“The Harley, over the years, has been a beacon for new music, bands, and grassroots promoters and a home for the fantastic independent restaurant, Twisted Burger Company. The venue may have come to an end, but the memories will live on.

“Any future events booked in for the venue will be moved to another venue, with the Harley team working with local promoters to ensure they go ahead. The team appear to be working on a new venue in the city centre. “Our events and music department, and key promoters, have begun working on a new city centre event space which will be announced very soon.”

The plight of independent gig venues in the UK was highlighted again recently when London club The Social was faced with closure.

Following a successful crowdfunding campaign, The Social was saved after surpassing their goal of £95,000 in less than a week.

The venue launched the campaign after releasing a statement which detailed “rising rents and an offer to the building’s leaseholder from a cocktail and wine bar chain” that put them “under very serious threat.”

The news came after the closure of another beloved venue, The Cellar in Oxford. The basement space was known for hosting intimate gigs and previously played host to bands such as Foals, who performed there at the very start of their career.

The Music Venue Trust claimed that a church organisation’s pursuit of “maximum profit” is to blame for the venue’s closure.