People Are Confessing Their Past Indie Sins Using #IndieAmnesty

Yesterday, Johnny Borrell had a rather public moment of cleansing: in an revealing interview with Noisey, he laid into mid-2000s “landfill indie” music, with no-one spared – not even his former bandmates.

It’s a startling read: there were observations like “The Kooks were probably the missing link between Razorlight and McFly”, punishing declarations of truth such as “The Ordinary Boys often get forgotten – and they are pretty forgettable” and the almighty knife-plunging that was his take on Razorlight drummer Andy Burrows’ solo career, labelling it as “so middle of the road it’s got more white lines than Liam Gallagher in 1997.” Stinging.

The fall-out from Borrell’s slamming of his former contemporaries may or may have not led us all to take a good, hard look at our past selves – did we really think that The View were all that and then some? Did I really own an Ordinary Boys CD? Was Art Brut’s ‘Formed A Band’ responsible for the springing up of every sixth-form band in 2004?

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And it’s precisely these sorts of things that Twitter users are confessing to today, with the hashtag #indieamnesty currently riding high at the top of the UK trending topics. In 2016, Twitter is our confession booth, and it’s time to be publicly admonished for our previous mistakes – yes, I really did go and see The Dead ’60s once, Father. Please find a way to forgive me.

The revelations have been coming in thick and fast, resulting in #indieamnesty becoming a fascinating and hilarious source of entertainment this Wednesday afternoon. Let’s go studs-up with the best of the confessions so far.

https://twitter.com/JackShankly/status/717708138342952960

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https://twitter.com/gemtriesharder/status/717691803810422785

https://twitter.com/JackShankly/status/717679761875734529

https://twitter.com/gregjames/status/717714454151106560

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