Courteeners, Bombay Bicycle Club and other big vinyl releases you need this week

You'll want these records in your collection...

In this fast-paced musical landscape, where it’s so easy to simply put a playlist on shuffle, nothing compares to putting a record on, sitting back and enjoying all it has to offer in full (or at least until you have get up again to flip it over).

Every week, we here at NME round up the best vinyl releases, available to buy or pre-order via Norman Records. Here are the latest picks.

Courteeners – ‘More. Again. Forever.’

NME say: 

In our four-star review of Courteeners’ sixth album, we praise the band for “their most focussed and adventurous work to date”, which sees the Manc group “step outside the box”. We note: “It’s escapist in its sound but humane in its approach to the world. It’s experimental but familiar, and tests what the band are capable of… [and] gives lie to the misconception that they rock out in the indie landfill, exploring psychedelia and glam electro”.

Norman Records say:

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Although they’re as much maligned as they are worshipped, Courteeners are undoubtedly one of the very last of the Big British Guitar Bands. Liam Fray and his faithful lieutenants release their sixth studio album, with the bold but ambiguous ‘More. Again. Forever.’

Bombay Bicycle Club – ‘Everything Else Has Gone Wrong’

NME say:

Bombay Bicycle Club are back with their first album since 2014 and it’s a combo of “nostalgic kicks and fresh new sounds”. Our review adds: “This comeback does a fine job of updating the beloved indie band’s trademark style… moments of authenticity that are a reminder of what a brilliant band Bombay Bicycle Club can be… Everything else may have gone wrong – but in amongst the chaos it sure is good to have Bombay Bicycle Club back.”

Norman Records say:

Having built up a large and dedicated fanbase over the course of four excellent albums before their hiatus in 2014, the mighty Bombay Bicycle Club finally break their silence with their fifth LP ‘Everything Else Has Gone Wrong’. Frontman Jack Steadman says it’s “an album for anyone who’s ever turned to music in a time of need”. With things being the way they are, I think we could all do with that.

Graham Coxon – ‘The End of The F***ing World 2 (Original Songs and Score)’

NME say:

It’s safe to say we’re big fans of Channel 4’s misanthropic teen adventure The End of The F***ing World, and its score by none other than Blur’s Graham Coxon is part of the brilliance. Following the airing of the show’s second series, you can pre-order this collection of 19 new tracks (some poignant, others chilling). Read NME’s interview with Graham Coxon about the soundtrack here.

Norman Records say:

Graham Coxon as you may know by now is the guitarist from Blur. He’s also done solo stuff and is now dipping his toe into the world of soundtracks. ‘The End of The F***ing World’ isn’t a look ahead to what will happen in… oooh about 2022, but a darkly comic tale about a pair of runaways. Coxon has already released the soundtrack to the first season, now courtesy of the aptly named Graham Coxon Records is Season 2.

Holy Fuck – ‘Deleter’

NME say:

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Holy Fuck’s new album, which features members of Hot Chip, Pond and more, looks to 90s rave inspiration and attempts to recreate the energy of the band’s live performances. Our review reads: “The most interesting moments on ‘Deleter’ arrive when the band embrace ’90s dance in all its euphoric, Technicolor glory. There is still plenty here for fans of the band’s more melancholic, anxiety-ridden electronica, but there’s some much-needed escapism to be derived from getting lost in Holy Fuck’s tripper soundscapes.”

Norman Records say:

‘Deleter’ is the fifth album by Canadian electronica band with the naughty name, Holy Fuck. The album goes from relatively minimal sounds to rapturous crescendo via krautrock’s motorik beats to deep house.

Algiers – ‘There Is No Year’

NME say:

Atlanta band Algiers have long been the genre-blurring kind and their latest is “a heady concoction of post-punk, ’60s soul and political insight”. In our review of the record, we call it “a more considered project than their somewhat reactionary 2017 album ‘The Underside Of Power’”, noting that album number three “finds Algiers mightier than ever”.

Norman Records say:

Algiers hail from Atlanta, Georgia, apart from drummer, Matt Tong, formerly of Bloc Party. They mix disparate styles such as post-punk and gospel into one rocking sound. The band also take influences from non-musical sources such as southern Gothic literature and politics.

Pinegrove – ‘Marigold’

NME say:

“This latest album sees Pinegrove enter into a new, more adult phase of their career, their flashy radicalism muted into a more subtle, less immediate aesthetic,” we write in our review of ‘Marigold’. “These world-weary yet radio-friendly ballads imply the band might achieve longevity after all. Three chords and the truth never gets old, and ‘Marigold’ vividly paints the knottiness of adulthood.”

Norman Records say:

Having released three previous studio albums to date, American indie stars Pinegrove begin the new decade with their debut for Rough Trade. Described by lead singer Evan Stephens Hall as bearing a “heart-first” perspective, ‘Marigold’ is the most ambitious take on their distinctive blend of folk, indie and country yet, as well as being their most empathetic and humanistic.

…And You Will Know Us By The Trail Of Dead – ‘X: The Godless Void and Other Stories’

NME say:

‘X: The Godless Void and Other Stories’ is the first album from Austin’s …And You Will Know Us By The Trail Of Dead since 2014. What have the band been doing since then? Well, drummer/singer Jason Reece moved to Cambodia and joined a bluegrass band, supposedly. It’s hard to see how that fed into their 10th LP, but the time out has allowed the band to return rejuvenated.

Norman Records say:

Texan art-rock icons …And You Will Know Us By The Trail Of Dead end their five-year silence with their tenth studio album. Grandiosely titled ‘X: The Godless Void and Other Stories’, sees the band sounding as fresh as they ever did, delicately balancing swirling, dream-pop noise with widescreen songcraft.

Keeley Forsyth – ‘Debris’

NME say:

‘Debris’ is the debut album from actor-turned-musician Keeley Forsyth, with the album reflecting the “darker” parts of domestic life, as told by Forsyth’s raw, Aldous Harding-esque vocals. “They’ve been in my mind for a while,” Forsyth says of the songs. “I have sung them to my children, and at home alone, and making this album has been an opportunity for me to discover the voice and being who sings these songs. It has changed me, and will continue to. I recognise my life again.”

Norman Records say:

You may have seen Keeley Forsyth in all sorts of things from Coronation Street to Luther, but these days it’s all about the music, which, in turn is mostly all about her exceptional and emotional vocal delivery. Her debut album, ‘Debris is for fans of Scott Walker, Nico, Cat Power, PJ Harvey and more.

The Men – ‘Mercy’

NME say:

The latest album from New York’s The Men sees the band subtly reinvent their scuzzy rock sound. As the band explain: “‘Mercy’ has a place next to ‘Drift’ (2018) and it’s now a distant neighbor to ‘New Moon’ (2013), ‘Devil Music’ (2016), and the others. It’s a wholly contained universe that shares the ash, the birth and the memory; the things motion takes with you after bumping into someone.”

Norman Records say:

The Men have been rather consistent over the last few years and this stability has led to their new album ‘Mercy’, on which they make music with some of the classic rock moves of the 70s era alongside the experimental churn of Suicide.

Pale Saints – ‘The Comforts Of Madness’

NME say:

‘The Comforts Of Madness’ from Leeds shoegazers Pale Saints was one of our top albums of 1990, finishing higher in NME’s end of year list than Depeche Mode but lower than Ice Cube. The record’s been re-released for its 30th anniversary, which could see a new audience rediscover the 4AD band amid the ongoing shoegaze revival.

Norman Records say:

Towards the end of the ‘80s Pale Saints, from Leeds, were part of a new movement in British indie known as shoegaze. Bands such as Ride, Slowdive and 4AD labelmates, Lush joined them in their quest, and would ultimately become better known. ‘Comforts of Madness’ was their debut, originally released in 1990, and it’s a bit of classic. This expanded reissue includes unreleased demos and a Peel Session from 1989.

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