Watch all the performances from The Brit Awards 2019

Most BRIT Award ceremonies are loaded with controversy, whether from an arse-waving from pop star (Jarvis Cocker to MJ in 1996) or a broadcaster with an itchy trigger finger on the censorship bleeper (ITV to Kanye West in 2015).

Except this one. Aside from The 1975’s speech about male misogyny in the music industry, Beyonce and Jay-Z’s nod to Megan Markle and an iffy joke or two from Jack Whitehall, this year was a bit of a snorefest.

So, for better or worse, we had to pay attention to this year’s performers, which you can do too by watching all the performances from The Brits 2019 below.

Hugh Jackman – ‘The Greatest Show’

If you insist, here’s actor, and er, pop star Hugh Jackman performing at The BRIT Awards in front of a room full of major label employees whose album releases have been fucked over by the chart-topping The Greatest Showman Soundtrack, which he features heavily on. Checkmate.

George Ezra – ‘Shotgun’

The butt of Jack Whitehall’s gags all night, The Nicest Guy In Pop Music served up a fittingly fine performance of ‘Shotgun’. 

Jorja Smith – ‘Don’t Watch Me Cry’

The Walsall singer returned to the BRITs stage after her duet with Rag’n’Bone Man in 2018 with an intimate and stripped-back version of ‘Lost & Found’ ballad, ‘Don’t Watch Me Cry’

Little Mix – ‘Woman Like Me’

The girl group took home the award for Best British Video for ‘Woman Like Me’ and gave the song an airing with pink-clad dancers and a guest spot from rising rapper Ms Banks.

Calvin Harris – ‘Giant’, ‘Promises’ and ‘One Kiss’

Before the Scottish producer picked up his the Brit Award for British Producer, a quick montage scooted through his array of stone-cold hits (‘Acceptable In The ‘80s’, ‘We Found Love’, ‘Feels’) and made you think – fucking hell, he’s good. The mash-up performance with Rag’n’Bone Man, Sam Smith and Dua Lipa featured his most recent releases, ‘Giant’ and ‘Promises’, but it was the Middle Earthy production for ‘One Kiss’ that’ll linger the longest.

Jess Glynne – ‘Thursday’

Perhaps the evening’s most impressive production, with a legion of performers and mirror-styled camera shots, Glynne built on the self-confident ethos of her single ‘Thursday’, enlisting rising R&B star H.E.R. along to belt out a powerful verse.

The 1975 – ‘Sincerity Is Scary’

The band of the hour incorporated some of their world-beating arena show into their performance. After picking up Best British Group and Best British Album, the band performed ‘Sincerity Is Scary’, utilising a treadmill and bunny hat to issue a resounding celebration of their huge night.

P!nk

The first female recipient of the Outstanding Contribution to Music put on a prop-thrilled, death-defying display as a teaser of what’s to come at her upcoming European stadium dates. Her catalogue’s recent material, including like ‘Walk Me Home’, ‘Just Like Fire’ and ‘Try’ got the biggest airings, but made for a relatively-spectacular finale in the face of a rather meh ceremony as a whole.