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These creepy front-facing Simpsons characters deserve their own horror film

The next treehouse of horror

When you think of the best, horror-infused episodes of the Simpsons, you probably think of the annual Treehouse of Horror episode, and the excellent homages to films, such as The Shining or the zombie version of Flanders. But an eagle eyed Twitter user has now realised that there is something even more terrifying than these episodes: and that’s front-facing Simpsons characters.

You may be able to hack even the most horrendous horror films and still be able to sleep at night, or be that fearless person who would happily bungee jump at a moments notice – but even the bravest won’t be able to deal with the abomination of these pictures:

https://twitter.com/butchcoded/status/968359568429510656

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As Twitter user @butchcoded pointed out – the images of the characters from the front are absolutely terrifying. Forget watching The Exorcist at your next horror movie marathon: all you need to do is stare into the eyes of these forward-facing Simpsons characters to feel deeply, deeply perturbed.

The Twitterverse is shook at how awful the Simpsons gang from the front is:

They’re even sharing their own, hideous, discoveries:

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https://twitter.com/Chainsaw_Sparkl/status/968963181447131136

However there is one exception, and that’s this blessed image of Marge looking glam af.

https://twitter.com/butchcoded/status/968360498713546753

Lord knows how it’s taken the Internet over 600 episodes to realise the true terror of the Simpsons facing forward – but now you’ve seen it, there is no chance you’ll be able to forget it. Have fun sleeping tonight…

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