‘Battlefield Bad Company 2’ was written to “take the piss” out of ‘Call Of Duty’

“I love those guys, but someone needs to take the piss out of them"

Battlefield Bad Company 2 lead designer David Goldfarb has shared that EA DICE‘s 2010 shooter was written to “poke fun at Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare.”

Speaking to NME for the latest Boss Level feature, Goldfarb – who wrote the script for Battlefield Bad Company 2‘s single-player campaign – said he was “writing it to kind of poke fun at Call of Duty: Modern Warfare.”

“I love those guys, but someone needs to take the piss out of them,” added Goldfarb.

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Goldfarb also acknowledged that Infinity Ward‘s Call Of Duty 4: Modern Warfare, which launched in November 2007, overshadowed the first Bad Company‘s launch in June 2008.

“That made everyone go, like ‘Oh Jesus’,” said Goldfarb. “When you compare [Bad Company] to Call of Duty 4, there’s an obvious mismatch in terms of visual fidelity and stuff.”

David Goldfarb
Credit: Dan Kendall for NME

While reflecting on his time on Bad Company 2, Goldfarb shared that although it was “kind of a blur,” the team’s intuitive approach tapped into good things early on. The developer recalled people “losing their minds really early in the development” over the shooter’s destruction physics, and Goldfarb added that Bad Company 2‘s audio design “was so amazing.”

“I don’t think I’ve ever heard a game sound better than Bad Company 2,” added Goldfarb. “I still maintain that that was the best DICE ever sounded.”

However, Goldfarb’s next Battlefield game – Battlefield 3 – did not hold the same magic for Goldfarb, despite launching to critical and commercial acclaim. “Battlefield 3 was less a labour of love for me. It was more of a ‘gotta make this work’,” said Goldfarb, who added that “a lot of the stuff I think I would have preferred to do, it just wasn’t possible.”

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Goldfarb went on to leave DICE in 2012, and is currently working on Metal: Hellsinger, a first-person shooter that’s about killing demons to the rhythm of a soundtrack created by the likes of Lamb of God, Serj Tankian, and Trivium’s Matt Heafy.

In other gaming news, electronic duo Autechre has claimed they were in the running to score Metroid Prime.

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