‘GhostWire: Tokyo’ update celebrates Children’s Day

The patch also includes performance updates and introduces "faster travel"

A new update for GhostWire: Tokyo celebrates Japanese national holiday Children’s Day with new emotes and helmets.

The update launched yesterday (May 2). Children’s Day is held annually on May 5 in Japan and is one of four national holidays observed during Golden Week.

According to Tango Gameworks, the holiday is “to celebrate the health and happiness of children, typically by decorating with fish-shaped kites and wearing paper samurai helmets.”

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“Now you can get in on the festivities in GhostWire: Tokyo,” continues the studio, as the update brings two new emotes to the game.

“Koinobori” sees Akito displays koi-shaped streamers while “They Grow Up So Fast” sees Akito proudly dons a folded paper “Kabuto” samurai helmet. There’s also the introduction of Paper Kabuto, which will allow players to wear the origami samurai helmet from the emote.

Elsewhere in the new update, Tango Gameworks has improved performance on PC and PS5 versions of the game, fixed “numerous” bugs and made it possible for players to adjust the volume of Tengu.

According to the patch notes “faster travel is now available in the game” but no further details have been shared.

GhostWire: Tokyo. Credit: Tango Gameworks.
GhostWire: Tokyo. Credit: Tango Gameworks.

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GhostWire: Tokyo was launched in March. In a three-star review of the game, NME wrote: “By essentially killing every single resident in the game’s opening cutscene, Tango does paint itself into a bit of a corner though, as its take on Tokyo is inherently lifeless. To some extent that works – there’s an eerie beauty in exploring the abandoned streets, your only company the clothes left behind when the population vanished.”

“But before long that isn’t enough, and the blame mostly falls on the fact that there simply isn’t much to do – and what’s there is frankly uninspired.”

It’s also been revealed that Tango Gameworks founder Shinji Mikami wants the studio to move away from the horror genre in the future.

“Of course, it’s nice to have fans think of us as a studio with a reputation for developing survival horror games,” he said. “But we also want to be viewed as a studio that can create a wider variety of games.”

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