‘Soccer Story’ is an open-world comedy RPG from No More Robots

Players can expect "a real Messi situation"

No More Robots has announced Soccer Story, an “open-world RPG about solving puzzles and saving the world.”

Set to launch later this year, Soccer Story will task players with solving puzzles and saving the world with their football.

An open-world RPG, Soccer Story‘s 15 plus hour runtime will involve a mix of quests, side-missions, and events; along with a four-player local multiplayer match mode.

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As for the game’s plot, No More Robots has shared the following:

“It’s been a year since The Calamity tore apart the very foundations of soccer as we know it. Since then, Soccer Inc. has made dang well sure that not a soul has been allowed to even look at a soccer ball, let alone kick it. It’s a real Messi situation, no doubt.”

Soccer Story. Credit: No More Robots.
Soccer Story. Credit: No More Robots.

No More Robots add that after a “magical football” chooses the player, they are tasked with “saving the future of sport, and bringing harmony to the world once more” – a mission that will involve doing battle against rival teams including “literal sharks, toddlers, old-age pensioners and ninjas.”

Soccer Story will be available on PC, Xbox, Nintendo Switch, PlayStation, and Google Stadia when it launches in 2022. The game will also be available on Xbox Game Pass, as one of “half a dozen” games that No More Robots director Mike Rose says will arrive on the subscription-based service over the next 12 months.

Earlier in the year, Rose told NME that putting No More Robots’ titles on Game pass “makes them sell so much more,” and refuted concerns surrounding the service.

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“That’s the thing that gets me the most in all of this, people making out like that is what’s harming the industry,” said Rose. “When really, it’s dinosaurs, not realising that things are moving on. And if you don’t get on the train, you can’t then complain when it’s passed you by.”

In other news, Microsoft has alleged that Sony pays developers to keep them from making games available on Xbox Game Pass.

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