Strange Scaffold moves into publishing with roguelite ‘Purgatory Dungeoneer’

"I will reach God himself through a strategy of unpredictable diversification," said Strange Scaffold director Xalavier Nelson Jr.

Strange Scaffold – creator of El Paso, Everywhere and Space Warlord Organ Trading Simulator – has announced that it will begin publishing games, starting with a roguelite RPG called Purgatory Dungeoneer.

Created by indie developer Damien Crawford, Strange Scaffold says that Purgatory Dungeoneer‘s full title – My Grandpa Died And All He Left Me Was This 1 Dungeon In Purgatory Filled With Nihilistic Adventurers – will continue the studio’s “monopoly on dangerously long game names.”

Purgatory Dungeoneer is a town-building roguelite RPG which tasks the player with “plundering a psychic hellmaw for personal closure”. Set to launch on Steam and itch.io in the third quarter of 2022, players will take control of a supernatural medieval village and form parties of retired adventurers to raid the “hellmaw” for resources.

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The game will feature over 400 possible residents that players can recruit, as well as more than 100 classes and over 1000 skills for adventurers to utilise.

You can watch a trailer for Purgatory Dungeoneer below:

On the decision to move into publishing, Strange Scaffold director Xalavier Nelson Jr. shared the following:

“I think of myself as a helicopter, and behind me is Death, flying a MIG-21. He sends a barrage of heat-seeking missiles towards my vulnerable chassis, and every project I take on is chaff sent into the air, delaying my demise in the face of the grave’s fury. I will reach God himself through a strategy of unpredictable diversification and expertly-executed airborne manoeuvres and it is with this hope that I approach every day as a bright and brilliant opportunity to make my little slice of this Earth a better place before boldly knocking at Heaven’s door when my work is done.”

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Last year, NME spoke to Nelson about his aim to create a “better, faster, cheaper, and healthier” way to develop games.

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