‘The Dark Pictures Anthology’ announces season finale, ‘The Devil In Me’

The fourth and final chapter of the Anthology’s first season is their “most bloodcurdling story yet”

The fourth chapter in The Dark Pictures Anthology has been announced, with The Devil In Me also acting as the season finale.

Following on from Man of Medan, Little Hope, and the recently released House of Ashes, The Devil In Me follows “a group of documentary filmmakers who receive a mysterious invite to a replica of the ‘Murder Castle’ of H.H. Holmes, America’s first serial killer. They soon discover that they’re being watched, and there is much more at stake than their viewing figures,” says the announcement.

Holmes built a hotel in Chicago the 1880s. The building was full of secret passages and sound-proofed rooms, as well as featured a torture chamber.

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It’s promised as “the anthology’s most bloodcurdling story yet, where each of your choices once again determines who lives and who dies. Watch in horror as your unfortunate crew falls prey to a twisted host who is observing their every move.”

Check out the trailer below:

“You want to know what it means to be a killer? Think of the most profound thing you’ve ever done. The most beautiful thing you’ve ever created. And I promise you, it’s nothing compared to watching the life bleed out of someone. To see the fear in their eyes. To feel them pawing at you for release. To hear them pleading, begging, that’s true art” says the shadowy figure in the trailer.

The announcement follows a teaser trailer released earlier in the week, with fans making comparisons to ‘Saw as the clip features images of torn flesh, knives, and a decomposing corpse.

The title was revealed back in July thanks to a trademark application, alongside plans for The Dark Pictures Anthology to feature eight chapters but the release date is still unknown.

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Speaking about the soundtrack to scary games, The Dark Pictures Anthology’s composer recently told NME: “I think as modern people, we’ve been trained to understand when things get quiet, it’s because something’s going to be loud,” explains composer Jason Graves, whose horror scores also include the Dead Space games and Until Dawn.

“But there’s a psychological reason behind that being scary, because if you were in the woods and you’ve got all these noises and then all the crickets stopped and the birds stop and everything gets completely silent you’d be like, ‘That’s not right’. Everyone’s being quiet for a reason because there’s something around the corner or in the woods…”

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