Billie Eilish says she “hated every second” of making her debut album

'When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?' was released in 2019

Billie Eilish has reflected on making her debut album, saying she “hated every second” of the process.

The singer released ‘When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?’ in March of 2019, with the album going on to top charts all around the globe.

In a new interview with Rolling Stone, Eilish said that despite the album’s eventual success, she didn’t enjoy the process of writing it.

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“I hated every second of it,” she said. “I hated writing. I hated recording. I literally hated it. I would’ve done anything else. I remember thinking there’s no way I’m making another album after this. Absolutely not.”

Discussing what changed between then and writing her second album – due out next month – Eilish said: “No one has a say anymore. It’s literally me and Finneas and no one else.”

Elsewhere in the new interview, the singer discussed her now-famous British Vogue cover shoot, saying some of the reactions to the striking cover were “not OK.”

The cover shoot, for the June 2021 issue of the fashion magazine, drew a lot of attention owing to Eilish’s fashion choices. A photo she shared of the cover broke the all-time record for Instagram likes, and currently sits at nearly 17 million likes.

“I saw a picture of me on the cover of Vogue [from] a couple of years ago with big, huge oversize clothes [next to the new Vogue cover]. Then the caption was like, ‘That’s called growth’,” she said.

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“I understand where they’re coming from, but at the same time, I’m like, ‘No, that’s not OK. I’m not this now, and I didn’t need to grow from that’.”

Reviewing ‘When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?’ upon its release, NME‘s Thomas Smith wrote: “‘When We All Fall Asleep…’ ticks all the boxes for a memorable and game-changing debut album. It’s enjoyable and familiar, but retains Billie’s disruptive streak.

“It’s a brave and resounding first step for an artist with bags of potential and over the next decade, you’ll no doubt see popular music scrabbling to try and replicate what this album does on every level.”

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