Dicta License address Philippines’ Martial Law on new single ‘Inosenteng Bala’

“In our silence, can we consider ourselves without fault?” questions frontman Pochoy Labog

Filipino band Dicta License have released a new single, titled ‘Inosenteng Bala’.

On the track, which released on Monday (September 21), the nu-metal band sing about the Philippines’ Martial Law, which was declared 48 years ago today by late dictator Ferdinand Marcos and lasted 14 years.

Stream the song below.

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Vocalist Pochoy Labog said via a press release that he had the song for a long time before he considered bringing it to the band. “If it isn’t obvious enough, it is the bullet speaking – a tool designed for violence,” he said. “And it does not want to kill anymore. It propounds questions about our methods in securing our communities.”

“How are we responding to these methods? Are we speaking out or do we choose to remain silent? In our silence, can we consider ourselves without fault?” he continued.

While the band has long been vocal about Philippines politics, Dicta License – which translates to “License To Speak” – admit they are not completely unafraid of the possible consequences. “Yes, it’s scary. But there are some non-negotiable issues today that should be spoken up about,” said guitarist Boogie Romero.

Romero went on to say: “Part of me is afraid to speak up. But when Pochoy approached me with his ideas, I felt this was the best way I could contribute to consciousness and change.”

Dicta License formed in 1999, their outspokenness influenced and encouraged by the likes of Rage Against The Machine and Public Enemy.

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The band’s most release prior to ‘Inosenteng Bala’ was ‘Salita’, which dropped in June, and tackles the topic of Philippines’ anti-terror bill. The bill, which was passed by President Rodrigo Duterte in July, has been criticised by rights groups and challenged with court petitions for its broad definition of terrorism and the powers it gives the administration to detain suspects without charge.

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