King Gizzard And The Lizard Wizard announce new concert film, share ‘Evil Death Roll’ video

A 90-minute video accompaniment to the 'Live In San Francisco '16' live album

King Gizzard And The Lizard Wizard have announced an accompanying concert film to their forthcoming ‘Live In San Francisco ’16’ live album.

The 90-minute film was shot and recorded live at the Independent, San Francisco, May 25 2016, during the promotional tour for ‘Nonagon Infinity’.

In an announcement post, the band noted that the film was “carefully reconstructed” by PHC Films – the same production company responsible for Chunky Shrapnel, their first concert film released earlier this year.

Advertisement

King Gizz have shared the first excerpt from the film, a monochrome and lo-fi performance of ‘Evil Death Roll’ – watch it below.

Live In San Francisco ’16 will be released on Vimeo on November 18 from 3:00pm ET, two days before the release of the live album. It will be available to purchase for AU$7, and will be available to stream on demand thereafter.

The preview of the film immediately contrasts to Chunky Shrapnel in that it is shot from several stationary cameras, as opposed to the director of the previous’ films, John Angus Stewart, roving handheld one.

Last week, King Gizz announced the release of their first studio album in over a year, ‘K.G.’ and shared the new single ‘Automation’. A week prior, they uploaded raw audio stems and video footage for ‘Automation’ to their website, asking fans to create their own remix and music video.

The record is also set to feature the previously released singles ‘Straws In The Wind’‘Honey’ and ‘Some Of Us’. ‘K.G.’ will be released the same day as the live album – November 20.

Advertisement

The new live album will be their fifth of the sort this year, including the double album accompaniment to Chunky Shrapnel.

In an interview with NME, Stewart spoke about what he hoped to achieve with the documentary.

“If you like this music, you’ll get an insight into who these people are,” he said.

“But I didn’t want to frame them as these godlike figures, because to me that’s kind of bullshit. They’re just normal dudes.”

Advertisement
Advertisement