Sea Girls share spirited cover of Mark Ronson and Miley Cyrus’ ‘Nothing Breaks Like A Heart’

"We’re really proud of how it’s turned out"

Sea Girls have shared a cover of Mark Ronson and Miley Cyrus‘ ‘Nothing Breaks Like A Heart’ – listen to it below.

Originally featured on Ronson’s 2019 album, ‘Late Night Feelings’, the sad banger caught the attention of Sea Girls frontman Henry Camamile while the band were on tour in Europe.

“The first time I heard it was when we were on our tour bus driving through Belgium in the middle of the night to play a festival in Germany the next day,” he said. “I couldn’t stop playing it for the next 24 hours. It just sounds like a classic. The lyrics are just infectious. ‘We live and die by pretty lies‘ tells a great story, you know?”

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He added: “We’re really proud of how it’s turned out and hopefully I’ve done Miley justice in the vocal delivery.”

You can listen to the band’s cover of ‘Nothing Breaks Like A Heart’, which was previously only available as an Amazon Original, below:

Camamile recently opened up on how suffering a traumatic brain injury influenced the direction of the band’s debut album, ‘Open Up Your Head’.

The singer of the hotly-tipped London band recalled how he hit his head on a pub cellar door, with the injury directly causing him to suffer from mental health struggles.

“I had a head injury and life wasn’t going great anyway. I was partying too much, and I was relying on the wrong things. I was a sad post-teen,” Camamile told NME.

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“I think that’s typical to a lot of people, but I experienced this head injury when I was knocked out at work. After that, my perspective just changed. With my writing, I was like: ‘Shit, I feel like I’m in fucking trouble’. Things had just got worse and I felt miserable.

“I started writing a lot more bluntly, a lot more truthfully.”

In a four-star review NME‘s Ali Shutler called ‘Open Up Your Head’ “an accomplished debut that takes Sea Girls’ brand of indie-rock on countless new adventures, and leaves plenty of doors ajar for further exploration for a genre in dire need of a kick up the backside”.

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