Sons of Metallica, Stone Temple Pilots and Guns N’ Roses members respond to Velvet Revolver comparisons

Two of the bandmembers' fathers were in the early noughties supergroup

Suspect208, the new band featuring the sons of Robert Trujillo, Scott Weiland and Slash, have reacted to fans likening them to Velvet Revolver.

The supergroup Velvet Revolver (2002-2008) comprised Guns N’ Roses‘ Slash and Stone Temple Pilots‘ Weiland along with other members of Guns N’ Roses.

Suspect208, meanwhile, is made up of Noah Weiland (son of late Stone Temple Pilots singer, Scott), Tye Trujillo (son of Metallica bassist, Robert) London Hudson (son of Guns N’ Roses guitarist, Slash), and Niko Tsangaris.

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Slash, Robert Trujillo. CREDIT: Scott Dudelson/Getty Images; Per Ole Hagen/Redferns

In a new interview with Appetite For Distortion podcast, it was put to the group that their debut single, ‘Long Awaited’, recalls the work of Noah and London’s fathers’ band.

“I didn’t try to do that [intentionally] or anything,” Noah said in response. “I don’t write songs; I just come up with it on the spot. I hear an instrumental or something for, like, 30 seconds to a minute, stop it, instantly put it in and just start recording it by myself. And as I go along, I just start coming up with different things.

“So that’s just kind of what came out of my ear. I wasn’t trying to sound like anything. My voice could sound completely different, which it does in most [other songs]. That’s a very small part of my voice, that song” [quotes via Blabbermouth].

Suspect208 were also asked about how they came up with their band name. “208 was the name of my studio, like the room number, and that’s kind of where me and Noah started making music together,” said London. “And that was just like our sanctuary, where we could spend all hours of the day — and night — make music, sleep. So that was our secret location. I guess for me, the shit that goes down there, from the outside, is suspect; [it’s] suspicious.”

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‘Long Awaited’ has racked up more than 800,000 views on YouTube since it was released on November 5.

“When I started seeing it get bigger, I was, like, ‘Dang!'” Noah said. “I didn’t really care, obviously… I care, but I know it’s not a shitty song. I think it’s probably one of my least favourite that I’ve made, surprisingly. But I still know it’s a good song.”

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