The Beach Boys share unreleased track ‘Carry Me Home’

The track was written during 1972's 'Holland' sessions by Dennis Wilson about a soldier dying in the Vietnam War

The Beach Boys have shared a previously unreleased track from the early 1970s – listen to ‘Carry Me Home’ below.

The track was written during 1972’s ‘Holland’ sessions by Dennis Wilson about a soldier dying in the Vietnam War.

‘Carry Me Home’ will appear on The Beach Boys’ upcoming ‘Sail On Sailor – 1972’ box set, which is due out on December 2 and will contain a huge 80 unreleased tracks. The latest chapter in The Beach Boys’ archival releases, the new box set revolves around the creation of 1972’s ‘Carl and the Passions – So Tough’ and 1973’s ‘Holland’.

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The album, available in a host of different formats and with countless rarities, can be pre-ordered here.

The track features vocals from Blondie Chaplin, who reflected on its creation in a new interview with Rolling Stone.

Chaplin said: “It’s eerie listening back to this song after all these years. It’s how Dennis felt at the time. I see him struggling with his own worries.

“The voice is really sensitive, and you can feel the emotional pain. War on the battlefield and inside, it’s always very combustible inside. He was the real surfer, rowdy and sweet.”

Listen to ‘Carry Me Home’ below.

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Earlier this year, The Beach Boys announced a year-long celebration for their 60th anniversary.

This summer, Capitol Records and UMe released a newly remastered and expanded edition of The Beach Boys career-spanning greatest hits collection, ‘Sounds Of Summer: The Very Best Of The Beach Boys’.

The Beach Boys are also participating in a new feature length documentary that is currently in the works. Other events include “a tribute special, prestigious exhibitions and events, unique brand partnerships,” according to a press release.

The Beach Boys said in a statement: “It’s hard to believe it’s been 60 years since we signed to Capitol Records and released our first album, ‘Surfin’ Safari.’ We were just kids in 1962 and could have never dreamed about where our music would take us, that it would have such a big impact on the world, still be loved, and continue to be discovered by generation after generation.

“This is a huge milestone that we’re all very honored to have achieved. And to our incredible fans, forever and new, we look forward to sharing even more throughout the year.”

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