The Locust drummer Gabe Serbian has died, aged 44

Serbian also played with Cattle Decapitation, Le Butcherettes, Zu, Head Wound City and more

Gabe Serbian, longtime drummer for San Diego grindcore band The Locust, has died at the age of 44.

The news was confirmed via the band’s social media channels, with a statement sharing that Serbian passed on April 30. “This world will miss Gabe as a friend, family member, musician, and artist,” the statement reads.

“He will continue to live on in so many ways and through everyone he has connected with during his time with us. May 1st is his birthday, and we hope that you can find a way to celebrate his life. During this difficult time we ask that you give Gabe’s family privacy.”

The Locust frontman Justin Pearson paid tribute to Serbian on Instagram, writing, “I wish I understood even a fraction of why things are the way they are in this world. Gabe Serbian passed away yesterday, and today would have been his 45th birthday. He was unlike any other human being I have encountered. He was the rarest of the rare.

“I like to think he and I had shared telepathy through music. He will be with me every single time I am on stage for the rest of my life. I am grateful for every second we shared together on this planet. I already miss him more than imaginable. I will miss him forever.”

Serbian joined The Locust in 1998, playing guitar on the band’s eponymous debut album that year. He switched to drums in 2001, a role he continued to play in the band up until his death. The Locust released two more full-length albums – 2003’s ‘Plague Soundscapes’ and 2007’s ‘New Erections’ – along with multiple EPs, a rarities compilation and live album.

Outside of The Locust, Serbian performed as part of Cattle Decapitation from 1996 to 2001, and played with Le Butcherettes, Zu and more. He also performed in numerous side projects with other members of The Locust, such as Retox, Holy Molar and Head Wound City, which also featured members of the Blood Brothers and Nick Zinner of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.

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