‘Final Fantasy 16’ is in the “final stages” of development

Work has been delayed due to COVID

According to producer Naiko Yoshida, Final Fantasy 16 is in the “final stages” of development.

The comments come via a magazine currently being given away for free in Uniqlo stores in Japan to celebrate its imminent Final Fantasy collaboration.

“We’re in the final stages of development for the new numbered game in the series, Final Fantasy 16. We aim to deliver a comprehensive game full of story and gameplay,” said Yoshida (and translated by @aitaikimochi).

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“Unlike an online game that involves many players at the same time, Final Fantasy 16 offers a different experience where it focuses on the individual player and immerses you in the story. I think it’s a very fleshed out story.”

He continued: “For those who have grown up and realised that reality isn’t kind to you and have drifted away from Final Fantasy, we hope that 16 will be a game that brings back anew the passion that you once had for the series.”

Back in October, Yoshida said that the game was nearly complete but by December, he announced that work had been delayed due to COVID-19.

“In an effort to offset the effects of COVID-19, we’ve had to decentralise that workforce by permitting staff to tackle their assignments from home,” Yoshida explained in a statement on social media. “This has unfortunately hampered communication from the Tokyo office, which, in turn, has led to delays in – or in extreme cases, cancellations of – asset deliveries from our outsource partners.”

As it stands, there’s no release date for Final Fantasy 16 though the franchise has big plans to celebrate its 35th anniversary throughout 2022.

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In other news, Ex-Nintendo of America boss Reggie Fils-Aimé has talked about his interest in blockchain technology and how it could be applied to different games.

“So I’m a believer in blockchain, I think it’s a really compelling technology,” Fils-Aimé said while at SXSW. “I’m also a believer in the concept of ‘play to own’ within video games, and I say this as a player where I may have invested 50 hours, 100 hours, or 300 hours in a game, and when I’m ready to move on to something else, wouldn’t it be great to monetise what I’ve built?”

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