Concrete Surfers take aim at the government in new song ‘Eat The Rich’

"It’s a bit of a fuck you really"

Concrete Surfers have given listeners another taste of their forthcoming EP with the release of their new single, ‘Eat The Rich’.

‘Eat The Rich’ is a rousing garage-rock track from the Brisbane band, who say that it was inspired by the Australian government’s “lack of overall support” to various industries in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It sort of stemmed at the beginning of COVID lockdowns in Australia,” the band said in a press statement.

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“Just to see the lack of overall government support for industries such as tourism, music and arts and hospitality made me angry that a country (that is quite wealthy) couldn’t give transparent support to industries that contribute so heavily to the economy. So it’s a bit of a fuck you really.”

The accompanying music video for the track is a send up of typically luxe music videos set on yachts.

“As a band we thought it would be fitting if we did a yacht rock style film clip,” the band said of the video.

“We wanted it to be ironic and comedic with wearing the white suits that are common with these videos, with the juxtaposition of using cheap tinnies in a dirty creek.”

‘Eat The Rich’ is Concrete Surfers’ second single of 2021 thus far, following the April release of ‘Driving’. Ahead of the release of ‘Driving’, the band supported Dune Rats on their DUNIESPALOOZA tour of Brisbane.

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Concrete Surfers are the latest act to condemn the government’s treatment of those in the arts industry. Earlier this week, San Cisco called directly upon the Queensland government for assistance after their show at Sunshine Coast venue NightQuarter was cancelled the day before it was set to go ahead.

“…Why are venues and concerts still being targeted by State governments as dangerous activities in comparison to major sporting events that are occurring every week?” Philip Stevens, of the band’s management team, said in a recent statement.

“The arts industry is suffering, especially the hundreds of musicians who have no clear pathway forwards for their careers.”

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