Watch Emily Wurramara’s new video for ‘Ngarrikwujeyinama’

The song originally appeared on Wurramara's debut album 'Milyakburra'

Emily Wurramara has shared a new video for ‘Ngarrikwujeyinama’, a track originally released in 2018 as the first single to Wurramara’s debut album ‘Milyakburra’.

The clip was filmed on location on Lutruwita country (Tasmania), where Wurramara currently resides, interspersed with footage sent in from around the world.

Watch the video for ‘Ngarrikwujeyinama’ below.

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NGARRIKWUJEYINAMA – Emily Wurramara

Ngarrikwujeyinama (I’m hurting) Produced by David BridieBacking Vocals: Saraima Navara Electric guitar: Benny Walker Drums: Guy Drory Keys: David Bridie Bass: Amy Chapman This was the first single release off my album”Milyakburra” When I wrote this song my community was in a battle against a mining company who wanted to mine our seabed.A Seabed mining industry would have threaten Marine life, water quality and culturally significant sites. 2 years ago The NT GOV quietly (dunno why they didn’t publicly announce but ok) extended a moratorium on seabed mining, it will now remain in place until 2021.My people are the Warnindilyakwa mob from Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra (Bickerton Island) our song lines run through the sea and through my country this Makarda is sacred, it connects us. We are caretakers of both this land and sea.First Nations voices aren’t at always at the forefront of these discussions, we have lived on this land for thousands of years, if you don’t know where to donate or how you can help I have put a couple of links below where you could donate or further educate yourself.Seed Mob: https://www.seedmob.org.au/The Wangan and Jagalingou Family Council: https://wanganjagalingou.com.au/donate/Fire Sticks: https://www.firesticks.org.au/A big thank you to everyone involved in the making of it.And a Big THANKYOU to my beautiful friends and family who sent in these wholesome clips.Sending love to you all and big soulful hugs your wayE. Wurramara

Posted by Emily Wurramara on Friday, August 14, 2020

 

The Groote Eylandt songwriter used the clip to call attention to ongoing attempts by mining companies to exploit First Nations land.

“When I wrote this song my community was in a battle against a mining company who wanted to mine our seabed. A seabed mining industry would have threaten marine life, water quality and culturally significant sites,” Wurramara wrote alongside the new clip.

“Two years ago the NT government quietly extended a moratorium on seabed mining, it will now remain in place until 2021.”

“My people are the Warnindilyakwa mob from Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra (Bickerton Island), our song lines run through the sea and through my country. This Makarda is sacred, it connects us. We are caretakers of both this land and sea. First Nations voices aren’t at always at the forefront of these discussions, we have lived on this land for thousands of years.”

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Wurramara also pointed fans in the direction of various First Nations-led organisations –Seed Mob, The Wangan and Jagalingou Family Council and Fire Sticks – encouraging people to learn and donate if they were able to.

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