Jack River’s Australian music push gets support from commercial streaming service Qsic

Their local music playlist is already on rotation in Australian 7-Eleven stores

Jack River‘s call for Australian businesses to play more local music has been answered by commercial streaming service Qsic and River’s management, UNIFIED.

Qsic is an Australian-owned service that provides licensed music streaming to more than 70 commercial businesses who collectively have 2,000 physical locations across Australia.

In response to River’s plea, Qsic has teamed up with UNIFIED Music Group and Mushroom Group to curate a playlist of local music to be distributed to its customers, replacing the service’s regular music programming.

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One of the first businesses to adopt the playlist has been 7-Eleven, which has had it on rotation across 700 stores since August 1.

“The last 18 months have been hard on everyone in one way or another, though the arts community are some of the people who have been doing it particularly tough,” said 7-Eleven’s General Manager, Julie Laycock.

“Jack River’s call out to use Aussie music in stores to provide much needed income to Australian artists is a fantastic initiative. We’re proud to support it.”

Speaking of the initiative, Qsic CEO and co-founder Matt Elsley said, “We’re in a unique position of influence to actively help Australia’s most prominent retail and hospitality businesses play a bigger part in assisting the industry recover.

“We’re now deep in rallying mode to bring our business partners onboard and are already receiving great support.”

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The initiative comes a week after River called on Channel 7 to play more local music during their Australian Olympics coverage. Journalist Edwina Bartholomew responded to River’s call, saying the network would “beef up the Aussie music in the arvos on @7olympics”.

River’s post also took aim at Australian corporations including Woolworths and Aldi, prompting organisations such as Coles, Channel 9 and Bank Australia to join the cause.

It has spurred a campaign called Our Soundtrack Our Stories, backed by APRA AMCOS, ARIA and other industry bodies.

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