Man allegedly breaks into Drake’s house, claims he’s the rapper’s son

Police did not buy the 23-year-old intruder's claim, resulting in his alleged arrest

Drake‘s new Beverly Hills mansion was recently subject to an alleged break-in by a man claiming to be the rapper’s son.

According to TMZ, an employee at the mansion reportedly spotted the 23-year-old intruder near the pool on Friday, July 15. Police arrived and subsequently questioned the man, who claimed 35-year-old Drake was his father, a claim that was justifiably dismissed as the man was reportedly arrested for misdemeanour trespassing.

The intruder never made it into Drake’s house, the outlet reports. Further information regarding the intruder or the incident have yet to be revealed.

Advertisement

Drake appears to have been subjected to his own encounter with the law recently. Following claims speculation on social media suggested that the Canadian star had been taken into custody by local police at a Stockholm nightclub, Drake’s team denied all speculations.

Drake. Credit: Ross Gilmore/Getty Images
Drake. Credit: Ross Gilmore/Getty Images

Drake would later post an image of an official police document, suggesting that he did in fact have some interaction with Swedish authorities. The document he shared was titled “Information for Those Suspected of a Crime and Subsequently Detained” that detailed a detainee’s rights, similar to the Miranda Rights used in the United States.

Drake has also announced the first three events of a new concert series dubbed ‘October World Weekend’, which will precede the worldwide expansion of his own music festival, OVO Fest. Tickets for the concerts went on sale on July 15, and promptly resulted in a bombardment of fan outrage at the ticket pricing for a concert that also boasts a Nicki Minaj– and Lil Wayne-led Young Money reunion.

The rapper’s most recent album ‘Honestly, Nevermind’, which was a surprise release coming not even a year after his previous 2021 effort ‘Certified Lover Boy’, was given a three-star review by NME which described the LP as “tiresomely woe-is-me as anything [Drake’s] ever done”, but was an “unexpected elevation from the bland trap, R&B remakes and Drake’s melancholic attitude to love we heard last time around.”

Advertisement

TRENDING

Advertisement