Pearl Jam share new digital mixes of ‘Ten’ and ‘No Code’ to mark landmark anniversaries

The band have also announced plans to host a free concert stream from 2014

Pearl Jam have shared new digital mixes of their debut album ‘Ten’ and their 1996 LP ‘No Code’.

The band, who are celebrating the 30th and 25th anniversary of both records today (August 27), posted mixes created by producer Josh Evans in Dolby Atmos and Sony 360 Reality Audio for ​”state-of-the-art immersive listening experiences”. You can listen to both records via the band’s YouTube channel here.

“These two albums sound amazing in the immersive format,” said Evans. “For ‘Ten’, the goal was to create the best version of the record, bigger, wider and higher fidelity; now, it actually sounds as great coming out of your speakers as it does in your memory of hearing it the first time.

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He added: “25 years ahead of its time, ‘No Code’ almost sounds like it was intended to be an immersive album; experimental layers, nuance and raw aggression are all amplified and expanded in a simultaneously bigger and more intimate experience.”

To mark the anniversaries, the band have also announced plans to host a free concert stream of their 2014 show in Moline, Illinois, where they played ‘No Code’ in its entirety.

You can listen to the show in the early hours of tomorrow morning (August 28) at 1am BST until 7.59am BST Tuesday (September 1) on the band’s official YouTube channel here and here. You can also listen to ‘In My Tree’ live from the show below.

Pearl Jam are also launching a campaign asking fans to share any memories, photos or videos related to ‘Ten’ and ‘No Code’ using the hashtags, #30YearsOfTen and #25YearsOfNoCode.

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Meanwhile, Matt Cameron – a former member of Soundgarden and the current drummer for Pearl Jamrecently paid tribute to late Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts, who died aged 80 earlier this week.

In a statement to SPIN Magazine, the 58-year-old drummer described Watts as “the epitome of cool.”

“His contributions to the world of music and drumming will live on forever,” said Cameron.

“He had a beautifully greasy swagger in his drumming that was completely his own thing. He gave the Stones an authentic swing that partly came from his love of African-American be-bop masters like Charlie Parker and Thelonious Monk.”

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