Slash on AC/DC’s ‘Power Up’ album: “It’s a great fucking record”

"It’s a really inspired album"

Guns N’ Roses guitarist Slash has praised AC/DC for creating a “great fucking record” after the rock icons returned with ‘Power Up’.

Speaking to Consequence Of Sound, Slash praised the band after they defied personal tragedy – including the death of founding guitarist Malcolm Young – to deliver their 17th studio album.

“The tragedy of losing Malcolm [Young, AC/DC’s founding rhythm guitarist]… the fact that Angus [Young] and company would survive that and keep it going, in the spirit of probably what Malcolm would have done, was great,” Slash explained.

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“I just love those guys because as far as rock ‘n’ roll is concerned, they just are driven.”

Hailing the band’s latest album specifically, he added: “Then, on top of it, they make such a great fucking record at this point in the game. It’s a really inspired album. I’ve had it in the car for the last couple of days and it’s probably gonna sit there for a while.

AC.DC (Picture: Press)

“It’s exciting for me. I’m happy for them, and I can’t wait for this virus situation to end so we can go check them out on tour somewhere.”

On the band’s influential legacy, Slash said: “They’re a great influence on people who think that rock’n’roll is sort of just fun and games, and then as soon as any kind of mishap happens, [bands] break up or they fall apart or they quit.

“AC/DC is a great example of longevity. They’re a great example of tenacity and perseverance, a great example of talent, and a great example of what rock ’n’ roll is all about. So, I’m so stoked that they just continue to do it.”

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Slash’s Guns N’ Roses bandmate Axl Rose joined AC/DC to complete their ‘Rock or Bust’ tour back in 2016 when hearing issues forced the departure of singer Brian Johnson.

In a four-star review of the band’s latest album, Power UpNME wrote: “While far from a reinvention of the wheel, ‘Power Up’ is a joyous celebration of the unbridled heavy rock that has served them well for almost 50 years and, we can hope, a unifying cry for the future.”

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