Slick Rick shares new mini-documentary highlighting his influence on shoe fashion

It also shines a light on the London-born rap legend's charity work

Slick Rick has shared a new mini-documentary that highlights his influence on shoe fashion – watch it below.

Created in partnership with Clarks Originals, the clip entitled Mind-Body-Sole focuses on the London-born rap legend’s longstanding relationship with the footwear brand.

Described as “a story of heritage, community and purpose above all”, the Katherine Mateo-directed doc follows Rick around landmark locations synonymous with his upbringing in the Bronx, New York, before making his way to the garment district in Manhattan, an area that greatly influenced the rapper’s love for fashion and design.

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Along the journey, Rick speaks in-depth about his relationship with Clarks Originals, specifically the Wallabee, a shoe that he has been wearing and customising since his emergence onto the scene in the early 1980s.

Towards the end of the clip, Rick, who recently launched the Victory Patch Foundation, visits a military recruitment office in the Bronx during Christmas to spread cheer to a group of government officials who he feels are often overlooked, underserved and under-appreciated. With help from Clarks Originals, he gifts them shoes to show his appreciation for their service.

Watch Mind-Body-Sole below.

Last year, Sotheby’s hosted its first hip-hop memorabilia auction, which saw Slick Rick’s diamond eyepatch sell for $25,200.

Other items on sale included 22 letters written by 2Pac to his high school sweetheart, Salt-N-Pepa’s jackets from the ‘Push It’ music video and the Notorious B.I.G’s iconic plastic crown, which sold for almost half a million pounds.

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The crown was worn and signed by Biggie, real name Christopher Wallace, in a 1997 photoshoot with Barron Claiborne, just three days before the rapper was shot and killed in Los Angeles.

Sotheby’s anticipated that the crown would sell for between £155,000 ($200,000 US) and £232,000 ($300,000 US), but its final bidding price of £461,005 ($594,750 US) exceeded expectations. As pointed out by the New York Post, its original retail price was only £4.65 ($6 US).

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