The Twilight Sad’s James Graham launches new Gentle Sinners project

You can listen to first single 'Killing This Time' now

The Twilight Sad‘s James Graham has launched a new project under the moniker Gentle Sinners.

READ MORE: The Twilight Sad on the legacy of Scott Hutchison and being Robert Smith’s favourite band

The Scottish band, whose most recent album ‘It Won/t Be Like This All The Time’ arrived in 2019, took to Instagram today (November 18) to announce that their frontman is now part of a new project.

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The announcement comes with the release of the project’s first single, ‘Killing This Time’.

Am I telling you everything?/ No I’m not/ Standing in the same place how am I lost/ Taking on their problems but at what cost?/ Am telling you everything/ No I’m not,” Graham sings on the song.

This is where you wanted me/ You’ve lucked out you can’t believe/ Hanging from the money tree/ We didn’t even plant the seed/ Take everything you cared about/ Have to learn to live without/ Take everyone you cared about.

You can listen to ‘Killing This Time’ below:

According to a brief bio of Gentle Sinners on Bandcamp, Graham has partnered with a mysterious second person. “Gentle Sinners are James Graham (The Twilight Sad) & someone else,” the description reads.

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Last month, The Twilight Sad announced a string of “stripped back” UK shows for 2022.

The band will kick off the intimate tour at EartH in London on January 18. Performances will follow at Leeds’ Brudenell Social Club (January 19), The Old Fruitmarket in Glasgow (21) and Edinburgh’s Assembly Rooms (22).

“Excited to announce that James and Andy will be playing a run of ‘Stripped Back’ UK shows in January next year,” the group wrote to announce the gigs. “Looking forward to seeing you all soon!”

Tickets are on sale now – you can purchase yours from here.

In a four-star review of ‘It Won/t Be Like This All The Time’, NME‘s Andrew Trendell wrote: “Rather than being owned by their demons, The Twilight Sad have created an 11-track exorcism to master them. It’s a full-bodied and inescapable mood-piece, and a visceral account of their victory in the fight to exist. We should feel grateful to have them.”

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