Watch Carole King and James Taylor live in new documentary trailer

It will include previously unseen footage of their joint live shows going back to 1970

A new concert documentary, Carole King & James Taylor: Just Call Out My Name, will showcase the two musical icons as they perform a section of hits from their respective back catalogues, as well as interviews exploring their career – watch the first trailer below.

The concert documentary will feature setlist highlights from King and Taylor’s 2010 ‘Troubadour’ reunion tour, including ‘You’ve Got A Friend’, ‘It’s Too Late,’ and ‘Sweet Baby James’.

The trailer also shows performances of ‘So Far Away’ and ‘Fire and Rain’ from King and Taylor respectively. Joint live shows from 1970 and 2007, including previously unseen footage, will provide additional live material.

Advertisement

Directed by Frank Marshall and commissioned by CNN Films and HBO Max, the show also includes footage of the pair being interviewed in July 2021 at the Southern New Hampshire University Arena in Manchester.

The documentary explores the story behind King and Taylor’s friendship, as well as detailing a number of song stories, including ‘You’ve Got a Friend’.

Taylor explained that he first heard King play the then new song – which she said “purely came through me” – at soundcheck before their debut Troubadour show together in 2010, and details how he came to cover it. Additional commentary comes from Danny Kortchmar, Russ Kunkel, and Lee Sklar, as well as musician and producer Peter Asher.

Carole King & James Taylor: Just Call Out My Name will premiere on January 2 at 9pm Eastern Time in the US (2am GMT) via CNN and will livestream via CNNgo. It will be available on demand from January 3 – 9 via cable and satellite providers, CNNgo, and CNN mobile apps. There is currently no information for audiences streaming from the UK.

You can watch the trailer here via Rolling Stone.

Advertisement

Earlier this year (October 11), Taylor – who is set to tour the UK in 2022 – spoke out about auditioning to join The Beatles‘ label Apple Records in the late 1960s.

“I had some kind of competence and the arrogance of youth, without which nobody would ever do anything, because you’d hedge your bets,” Taylor recalled to GuitarWorld of auditioning in front of Paul McCartney and George Harrison.

“I also knew that it was somehow good. It worked for me, and I was a music connoisseur. I thought, ‘This stuff could go somewhere. I want somebody to hear this.’ I’ve had that feeling a few times, at different points in my life,” he said.

Advertisement
Advertisement