‘Avengers: Endgame’ writers rule out Captain American fan theory

Some viewers had suggested the superhero could use the Infinity Gauntlet

The writers of Avengers: Endgame have ruled out one fan theory surrounding Captain America in the recent Marvel movie.

Since the film was released last month, fans have been analysing each scene to pick up clues for the future of the Marvel Cinematic Universe and coming up with theories about the action that unfolded.

One such theory suggested that Captain America (played by Chris Evans) could use the Infinity Gauntlet and survive. So far, only two characters have achieved that feat – Thanos (Josh Brolin) and The Hulk (Mark Ruffalo) – but viewers thought one moment in Infinity War hinted that Captain America could be the third.

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In the scene, the superhero is seen briefly pushing back Thanos’ gloved hands and keeping him at bay. Fans proposed that that meant the Gauntlet was responding to the strength of Cap’s will.

However, writers Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely have disputed that theory. “I think Steve would be toast,” Markus told The Hollywood Reporter. “I think, in that moment, Thanos is impressed by Steve’s will. He’s like, ‘I can’t believe this guy who apparently has no powers is trying this.’ He’s almost like, ‘Really? Really?’”

Meanwhile, the directors of Endgame have explained why Captain Marvel didn’t have more screen time in the movie.

The Russo brothers said Brie Larson’s character spent most of the film in another part of the universe partially because of how new she is in the MCU. Joe Russo added: “We love this idea that there are thousands of stories going on, and Carol, because of her abilities, is constantly in demand.”

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